Where Baby Stay In Stomach

The amniotic sac is filled with amniotic fluid which is a liquid made by the baby and the amnion. This protects the fetus from injury and helps to regulate temperature.

The amniotic sac is filled with amniotic fluid which is a liquid made by the baby and the amnion. This protects the fetus from injury and helps to regulate temperature.

The amniotic sac helps to protect the baby during pregnancy. The amniotic sac is a thin-walled sac that surrounds and protects the baby. It also helps to regulate the baby’s temperature.

The amniotic sac is a bag of fluid that grows with your baby inside your uterus throughout pregnancy. You might have heard it called your baby’s “water bag” or “bag of waters.” It holds the fetus, protects the fetus from injury, and helps to regulate his temperature. The bag also contains lanugo (the fine hair that covers the body and head of a fetus) and vernix caseosa (the white cheese-like substance that gives skin its wrinkled appearance).

During pregnancy, the baby is protected and cushioned in the amniotic sac. The sac is filled with amniotic fluid which surrounds and protects the baby from injury

During pregnancy, the amniotic sac protects your baby and helps him to grow. Amniotic fluid provides a cushion, allows room for movement, and protects your baby from injury.

Your body is going through a lot during pregnancy, but your baby is growing and changing even more.

So much happens during pregnancy. Our bodies do amazing things during this journey to create new life. Once you become pregnant, the lining of your uterus thickens and its blood vessels enlarge to nourish your baby. As your pregnancy progresses, the uterus expands to make room for the growing baby. By the time your baby is born, your uterus will be many times its normal size.

Your Body Before Pregnancy

Before pregnancy, most of the space in your abdomen is taken up by the large and small intestines. There is no real separation between the areas of your pelvis and abdomen.

In the picture here, you can see that the vagina is behind the bladder (sac that collects urine) and urethra (tube for moving urine out of bladder and body). In its normal position, your uterus is above and behind the bladder, with the cervix protruding into the vagina. The pelvic colon, rectum and anal canal are behind the vagina and uterus.

Glossary

Fetus_in_utero

Amniotic Sac: A thin-walled sac that surrounds the baby during pregnancy. The sac is filled with amniotic fluid which is a liquid made by the baby and the amnion (the membrane that covers the fetal side of the placenta). The amniotic sac protects the fetus from injury and helps to regulate his temperature.

Cervix: The lower part of the uterus that projects into the vagina and opens/dilates at birth. Made up of mostly fibrous tissue and muscle, the cervix is circular in shape.

Egg: The female reproductive cell produced in and released from the ovaries; also called the ovum.

Fertilization: Joining of the egg and sperm.

Fetus: The term for an unborn baby from the eighth week after fertilization until birth.

Placenta: An organ, shaped like a flat cake, which only grows during pregnancy and provides nourishment to and takes waste away from the fetus.

Sperm: A male cell that is produced in the testes and can fertilize a female egg cell.

Umbilical Cord: A rope-like cord connecting the baby to the placenta. The umbilical cord contains two arteries and a vein that carry oxygen and nutrients to the fetus and waste products away from the baby.

Uterine Wall: The wall of the uterus.

Uterus (also called the womb): The uterus is a hollow, pear-shaped organ located in a woman’s lower abdomen, between the bladder and the rectum, that sheds its lining each month during menstruation. When a fertilized egg (ovum) becomes implanted in the uterus, the baby develops there.

Vagina: The part of the female genitals, behind the bladder and in front of the rectum, that forms a canal extending from the uterus to the vulva. Also called the birth canal.

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