Cold And Cough Medicine For Baby

Say goodbye to scratchy throat, red eyes and sleepless nights. Children’s cold & cough medicine for babies is designed for those who suffer from coughs and nasal congestion due to cold and flu. The best cold and cough medicine for baby. Helps meet your child’s needs – with a super soft formula that immediately begins to relieve their pain, fever, stuffy nose and chest congestion. Organic, pure and gentle to the tummy. Boost your baby’s immune system with our natural, homeopathic remedies. We created these effective formulas to help soothe cold and cough symptoms, and support their overall health.

It’s normal for a child to have 8 or more colds a year.

This is because there are hundreds of different cold viruses and young children have no immunity to any of them as they have never had them before.

They gradually build up immunity and get fewer colds.

Most colds get better in 5 to 7 days but can take up to 2 weeks in small children.

Here are some suggestions for how to ease the symptoms in your child: 

  • Make sure your child drinks plenty of fluids.
  • Saline nose drops can help loosen dried snot and relieve a stuffy nose. Ask a pharmacist, GP or health visitor about them.
  • If your child has a high temperature, pain or discomfort, children’s paracetamol or ibuprofen can help. Children with asthma may not be able to take ibuprofen, so check with a pharmacist, GP or health visitor first. Always follow the instructions on the packet.
  • Encourage the whole family to wash their hands regularly to stop the cold spreading.

Cough and cold remedies for children

Children under 6 should not have over-the-counter cough and cold remedies, including decongestants, unless advised to by a GP or pharmacist.

Information:

Call a pharmacy or contact them online before going in person. You can get medicines delivered or ask someone to collect them.

Children’s sore throats

Sore throats are often caused by viral illnesses such as colds or flu.

Your child’s throat may be dry and sore for a day or 2 before a cold starts. You can give them paracetamol or ibuprofen to reduce the pain.

Most sore throats get better on their own after a few days.

If your child has a sore throat for more than 4 days, a high temperature and is generally unwell, see a GP.

If they’re unable to swallow fluids or saliva or have any difficulty breathing, go to A&E or call 999 immediately as they’ll need urgent treatment in hospital.

Find your nearest A&E department

Children’s coughs

Children often cough when they have a cold because of mucus trickling down the back of the throat.

If your child is feeding, drinking, eating and breathing normally and there’s no wheezing, a cough is not usually anything to worry about.

Although it’s upsetting to hear your child cough, coughing helps clear away phlegm from the chest or mucus from the back of the throat.

If your child is over the age of 1, they can try drinking a warm drink of lemon and honey.

To make hot lemon with honey at home, you need to:

  • squeeze half a lemon into a mug of boiled water
  • add 1 to 2 teaspoons of honey
  • drink while still warm (do not give hot drinks to small children)

If your child has had a cough that’s lasted longer than 3 weeks, see a GP.

If your child’s temperature is very high, or they feel hot and shivery, they may have a chest infection. You should take them to a GP, or you can call 111.

If this is caused by bacteria rather than a virus, the GP will prescribe antibiotics to treat the infection. Antibiotics will not soothe or stop the cough straight away.

If a cough continues for a long time, especially if it’s worse at night or is brought on by your child running about, it could be a sign of asthma.

Take them to a GP, who will be able to check if your child has asthma.

If your child is finding it hard to breathe, go to A&E or call 999 immediately as they’ll need urgent treatment in hospital.

Find your nearest A&E department

Find out more about coughs

Croup

A child with croup has a distinctive barking cough and will make a harsh sound, known as stridor, when they breathe in. 

They may also have a runny nose, sore throat and high temperature.

Croup can usually be diagnosed by a GP and treated at home.

But if your child’s symptoms are severe and they’re finding it hard to breathe, go to A&E or call 999 immediately as they’ll need urgent treatment in hospital.

Find your nearest A&E department

Read more about the symptoms of croup

Children’s ear infections

Ear infections are common in babies and small children. They often follow a cold and sometimes cause a high temperature.

A baby or toddler may pull or rub at an ear. Other possible symptoms include a high temperature, irritability, crying, difficulty feeding, restlessness at night, and a cough.

If your child has earache, with or without a high temperature, you can give them paracetamol or ibuprofen at the recommended dose.

Try one medicine first and, if it does not work, you can try giving the other one.

You should not give children paracetamol and ibuprofen at the same time unless advised to by a healthcare professional.

Do not put any oil, eardrops or cotton buds into your child’s ear, unless a GP advises you to do so.

Most ear infections are caused by viruses, which cannot be treated with antibiotics.

They’ll just get better by themselves, usually within about 3 days.

After an ear infection, your child may have some hearing loss.

Their hearing should get better within a few weeks. But if the problem lasts for any longer than this, ask a GP for advice.

Find out more about ear infections

Glue ear in children

Repeated middle ear infections (otitis media) may lead to glue ear (otitis media with effusion), where sticky fluid builds up and can affect your child’s hearing. 

This may lead to hearing loss, which is usually temporary.

If you smoke, your child is more likely to develop glue ear and will get better more slowly.

A GP can give you advice on treating glue ear and can help you stop smoking.

Great tasting, natural and non-drowsy. Honey helps loosen the mucus on your baby’s chest, making it easier to clear away. When your infant is dealing with the pain and discomfort of cold and flu symptoms, Similasan Ear-ache & Nasal Decongestant will help soothe his inflamed nasal passages and reduce the swelling in his throat – giving him relief from congestion and a dry, raw feeling in his nose.homeopathy medicine for cold and cough for baby

Homeopathy Medicine For Cold And Cough For Baby

Homeopathy medicine for cold and cough for baby is the best treatment when your child does not feel well. Homeopathy medicine for cold and cough for baby, family medicine or medicine for home use. The composition of homoeopathic medicines are so prepared that it is able to cure the disease in natural way.

What to do when young children have an upper respiratory infection, and symptomatic relief seems hard to come by? This can be a difficult task for parents and healthcare providers alike. Into this quandary stepped two researchers from Seattle, whose aim was to test the efficacy of homeopathy.

In this study, participants were recruited from a pediatric outpatient clinic. These recruits included children 2-5 years of age with a diagnosis of an upper respiratory tract infection and symptoms less than seven days; they were randomized to receive a homeopathic cough syrup or placebo. Children were excluded if they had already taken a homeopathic remedy in the previous 48 hours, if they had asthma, or if they were prescribed medicines at that clinic visit or were taking medicine prescribed at a previous visit.

If the parents of the children elected to participate in the trial, they were asked to rate four of the child’s symptoms (runny nose, cough, sneezing, and congestion) each on a scale of 0 (none) to 4 (severe). The treatment group received Hyland’s Cold ‘n Cough 4 Kids containing the seven remedies listed in Table 1. As an aside, the product used in this clinical trial included 6X and 12X homeopathic remedies. A 6X homeopathic remedy contains a substance that was diluted in a ratio of 1:10 six consecutive times, and a 12X remedy was diluted in that way 12 times. The syrup was sweetened with a glycyrrhiza extract, as was the placebo syrup, rendering both indistinguishable. The syrups were dosed one teaspoon (5 mL) every 4-6 hours as needed to treat cold symptoms up to a maximum of six times daily for three days.

Table 1: Homeopathic Remedies Contained in the Cough Syrup Used in this Study
Allium Cepa (6X)Hepar Sulph Calc (12X)Natrum Muriaticum (6X)Phosphorus (12X)Pulsatilla (6X)Sulphur (12X)Hydrastis (6X)

Information about the changes in symptoms were recorded by the parents. Table 2 shows the rating systems used and includes overall symptoms, symptom changes, and side effects for the three-day treatment period. A follow-up phone call was made 5-10 days after enrollment to re-assess some of the variables. (See Table 2.) In addition, parents were asked about the child missing school or daycare, or if the parent missed work, as well as if the child was administered any other treatments during the study period. From the data resulting from the first line of Table 2, overall severity, a composite cold score (CCS), was created by adding the four scores for a total ranging from 0-16.

Table 2: Parental Recording of Variables During the Three Days of Treatment with Cough Syrup
VariableTime Variable Was AssessedMeasurement
Overall severity of runny nose, cough, sneezing, and congestion during the previous 12 hoursMorning and evening for three days; and 5-10 days after enrollment4-point scale as with intake
Current runny nose, cough, sneezing, and congestionOne hour after each dose of syrup for a maximum of 10 entries7-point Likert scale (“much worse” to “much improved”)
Changes in irritability, lethargy, fussiness, and appetiteOne hour after each dose of syrup for a maximum of 10 entries7-point Likert scale (“much worse” to “much improved”)
Side effects of the syrupOne hour after each dose of syrup for a maximum of 10 entries; and 5-10 days after enrollmentFree list
Five-item functional health scaleOnce daily; and 5-10 days after enrollmentReferenced but not specified
Overall healthOnce daily; and 5-10 days after enrollment1 (totally well) to 10 (very sick)

From the enrollment period, 261 children were eligible for randomization to the homeopathic syrup (n = 128) or the placebo syrup (n = 133). Out of this group of 261, 154 returned information after the syrup dosages and 162 returned the other information about symptoms, overall health, and function. There was no statistical difference between the groups who returned information or who didn’t return information with respect to demographics and clinical characteristics. All told, 244 children “completed follow-up,” although the researchers didn’t specify what this meant.

The placebo and homeopathic groups did not differ significantly for any of the symptoms one hour after syrup dosage. However, for the twice-daily assessment of cold symptoms, some differences appeared. Compared to baseline, the homeopathic syrup group improved more than the placebo group for runny nose, cough, and sneezing (improvements ranged from -0.22 to -0.39; P = 0.05-0.001), but not congestion. Interestingly, this improvement occurred only for the first day, disappearing by day 3; that is, by the end of the treatment period, both groups had improved similarly. The CCS behaved similarly: For the first day, the homeopathic group had changed more from baseline than the placebo group. (See Table 3.) The CCS scores were not statistically significantly different for the other days.

Table 3: Changes in the Composite Cold Score from Baseline, a Negative Score Means More Improvement
Day 1Day 2Day 3
MorningEveningMorningEveningMorningEvening
Placebo0.32*-0.13**-1.19-1.25-2.26-2.27
Homeopathy-0.13*-1.25**-1.82-2.04-2.46-2.65
*P = 0.005 comparing the two; **P = 0.007 comparing the two

Interestingly, 13 children in the homeopathy group were given ibuprofen the first morning after randomization, compared to only two in the placebo group (P = 0.04). Also, chest rubs were administered to 13 children in the homeopathy group but to only two in the placebo group the first morning (P = 0.002) and the second morning (P = 0.028). All functional outcomes were similar between the two groups for any day. When follow-up contact occurred at day 5-10, cough severity was worse for the homeopathy group compared to placebo (P = 0.009). More side effects (9/75) were noted in the homeopathy group compared to the placebo group (2/79) (P = 0.02). None of the side effects were serious, but rather involved mostly gastrointestinal symptoms.

COMMENTARY

There is a gap in treatments available for young children with cold symptoms who are not prescribed a medicine. What are parents supposed to do? Many over-the-counter medicines are not appropriate for this age group, and symptomatic measures might only partially alleviate coughing and congestion that compromise sleep, eating, and the ability to return to schools or daycares and, therefore, return to work for parents.

Does this study highlight an intervention that could fill this niche? Possibly, but the clinical ramifications of these findings are narrow. After three days of the use of a cough syrup with seven homeopathic remedies, there was a slight improvement in some cold symptoms for the first day, but not thereafter. For suffering children (and parents), that is at least something, but it wasn’t sustained for the rest of the trial, not to mention the fact that at day 5-10, the children’s coughs were actually worse in that group. The researchers posited that it might be because of a rebound in symptoms after stopping the therapy, but it could be considered actually a side effect — something worth factoring into our decision-making as clinicians until this study is replicated.

There are flaws in this trial that are worth keeping in mind. A large percentage of the study participants did not return the logs of symptoms after dosing nor the diaries with the other information about function and overall response to treatment. The authors mentioned this as a potential bias, even though the “returner” group and the “non-returner” group had statistically similar demographics and characteristics. Furthermore, no mention was made of the higher adverse effect rate in the homeopathy group. The conventional wisdom is that homeopathy either helps or doesn’t have any effect; it is thought to be quite safe. Of course, skeptics of this type of therapy would say that it’s safe because there is nothing actually in a homeopathic remedy. Regardless of the somewhat difficult-to-grasp mechanism of action, it’s worth noting the adverse effects as we counsel our patients. Perhaps these remedies aren’t as innocuous as previously thought.

There are not many clinical trials examining homeopathic remedies. From the landmark trial showing benefit in childhood diarrhea in Nicaragua1 to trials on arnica homeopathics perioperatively,2 this trial was a valiant effort. The authors mentioned other clinical trials using homeopathic remedies in upper respiratory tract infections to which this current study contributes some information. For those children suffering from colds, benefiting minimally from conservative treatment, perhaps a day of relief, even a little bit, might be just what the doctor ordered.

Best Medicine For Cold And Cough For 1 Year Baby

What are the common Cough and Cold medicines used in children
Drug Group
 Examples
 Precautions
 1.Analgesics and anti-pyreticsParacetamol and ibuprofen*Aspirin is not recommended for use in children under 16 years of age unless otherwise prescribed by a doctor.2.Decongestants
Oral: pseudoephedrine*, ephedrine* and phenylephrine

Topical: oxymetazoline or xylometazoline nasal dropsDecongestants should not be used for longer than 7 days as rebound congestion can occur.3.Nasal drops
Normal saline (sodium chloride 0.9%) nasal dropsAdministration before feeds may ease feeding difficulties caused by nasal congestion.4.Cough medicines
Non-productive cough (i.e. Cough without chesty or dry cough):
Cough Suppressants
codeine*, pholcodine* and dextromethorphan*

Productive cough (i.e. Chesty cough):
(i) Expectorants
ammonium salts, guaifenesin and sodium citrate.

(ii) Mucolytics
bromhexine, ambroxol, acetylcysteine and carbocisteineCodeine is contraindicated for all children younger than 12 years of age. Avoid the use of codeine in adolescents 12 to 18 years of age who have other risk factors that may increase their sensitivity to the respiratory depressant effects of codeine unless the benefits outweigh the risks. Risk factors include conditions associated with hypoventilation, such as postoperative status, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, severe pulmonary disease, neuromuscular disease, and concomitant use of other medications that cause respiratory depression.5.Antihistamines
Chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine* and promethazine*.Antihistamines should not be used in treating chesty coughs as they reduce bronchial secretions, leading to the production of more viscous mucus which becomes more difficult to remove.
* Apart from oral products solely contain paracetamol, which are sold over-the-counter as branded products or under the generic name paracetamol, cough and cold medicines may contain controlled ingredients that can only be supplied by doctors or be sold in pharmacies in the presence and under the supervision of registered pharmacists. Please consult your pharmacist in case of doubt.

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Recent recommendations for safe use of Cough and Cold medicines in ChildrenCough and cold medicines are not indicated for children under 6 years old. If your child is suffering from symptoms of cough and cold, you should consult your doctor for the most appropriate treatment.
Codeine is contraindicated for all children younger than 12 years of age. Avoid the use of codeine in adolescents 12 to 18 years of age who have other risk factors that may increase their sensitivity to the respiratory depressant effects of codeine unless the benefits outweigh the risks. Risk factors include conditions associated with hypoventilation, such as postoperative status, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, severe pulmonary disease, neuromuscular disease, and concomitant use of other medications that cause respiratory depression.

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Communication with your doctors or pharmacistsCough and cold medicines, particularly when used in children, should preferably be used under the close supervision of a pharmacist or a doctor.
Read the labels of the cough and cold medicines carefully, and be familiar with the name and dosage of the drugs. Be cautious about their possible side effects. Many cough and cold medicines contain a number of active ingredients and you should read the labels carefully or consult your doctor or pharmacist to understand these active ingredients and the possible drug interactions with other medicines taking by your child. Avoid taking drugs which contain the same type of active ingredients to prevent overdose.
Seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if your child experience any symptoms or side effects suspected to be related to the cough and cold medicines taken, e.g. unusual drowsiness, abdominal distension or urinary retention.
Some cough and cold medicines are distributed into breast milk and may cause adverse reaction in breastfed infants. Inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are breastfeeding so that they can consider other options. For medicines containing codeine, because of the potential for serious adverse reactions, including excess sedation, respiratory depression, and death in a breastfed infant, breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with codeine.

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What other precautions shall be taken before using Cough and Cold medicines in childrenIt is always prudent to seek your doctor or pharmacist for advice on the best treatment option for your child’s symptoms. Different cough and cold medicines may have different therapeutic effects and side effects; your doctor or pharmacist will recommend the most appropriate drugs for your child’s symptoms.
Tell the doctor or pharmacist the medical, drug and allergy history of your child and any drugs that your child is taking because cough and cold medicines may interact with other drugs and medical conditions.
Breastfeeding mother should seek medical advice before taking any cough medicines. For medicines containing codeine, because of the potential for serious adverse reactions, including excess sedation, respiratory depression, and death in a breastfed infant, breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with codeine.
Medicines should not be shared between individuals, especially between an adult and a child.
The remaining medicine after a completed treatment must not be re-used again and should be discarded.

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Storage of medicinesAll medicines must be stored in a cool dry place. Unless specified on the labels, medicines should not be stored in refrigerator and must be kept out of the reach of children to prevent accidental ingestion or poisoning

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