Vaccination Chart For Baby

The chart above is a guide to your child’s recommended immunizations. Most babies will receive four shots of Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis in their first six months at two months, four months, 6 months and 15-18 months, with the Hib booster starting at 12 months through age 18 months. They will also get a dose of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) at 12-15 months through age 5 years. Your child will continue to receive pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PCV13) until 8 years old or 10 years old, whichever comes first.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Protect your baby from 14 serious diseases in just 12 inoculations. It’s also important to keep track of when your baby receives each vaccine, so make sure to mark your calendar with the correct date and time.

the shot day care center will make sure your baby gets all the vaccines she needs, but you can track this information yourself in this handy chart.

Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine is given to children under 7 years old. It is recommended that babies get their first dose at 2 months of age and the second dose when they are 4 months old. Those under 7 years old should get their third dose of DTaP at 6 years old.

Babies need vaccines to help them stay healthy. Vaccines can prevent babies from getting sick or keep them from getting very sick. Here are some important vaccines that your baby needs in the first 2 years.

Vaccination Chart With Age

*Two doses given at least four weeks apart are recommended for children age 6 months through 8 years of age who are getting an influenza (flu) vaccine for the first time and for some other children in this age group.

§Two doses of HepA vaccine are needed for lasting protection. The first dose of HepA vaccine should be given between 12 months and 23 months of age. The second dose should be given 6 months after the first dose. All children and adolescents over 24 months of age who have not been vaccinated should also receive 2 doses of HepA vaccine.

If your child has any medical conditions that put him or her at risk for infection or is traveling outside the United States, talk to your child’s doctor about additional vaccines that he or she may need.

Vaccine-Preventable Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them

DiseaseVaccineDisease spread byDisease symptomsDisease complications
ChickenpoxVaricella vaccine protects against chickenpox.Air, direct contactRash, tiredness, headache, feverInfected blisters, bleeding disorders, encephalitis (brain swelling), pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
DiphtheriaDTaP* vaccine protects against diphtheria.Air, direct contactSore throat, mild fever, weakness, swollen glands in neckSwelling of the heart muscle, heart failure, coma, paralysis, death
HibHib vaccine protects against Haemophilus influenzae type b.Air, direct contactMay be no symptoms unless bacteria enter the bloodMeningitis (infection of the covering around the brain and spinal cord), intellectual disability, epiglottitis (life-threatening infection that can block the windpipe and lead to serious breathing problems), pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
Hepatitis AHepA vaccine protects against hepatitis A.Direct contact, contaminated food or waterMay be no symptoms, fever, stomach pain, loss of appetite, fatigue, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes), dark urineLiver failure, arthralgia (joint pain), kidney, pancreatic, and blood disorders, death
Hepatitis BHepB vaccine protects against hepatitis B.Contact with blood or body fluidsMay be no symptoms, fever, headache, weakness, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes), joint painChronic liver infection, liver failure, liver cancer, death
Influenza (Flu)Flu vaccine protects against influenza.Air, direct contactFever, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, extreme fatiguePneumonia (infection in the lungs), bronchitis, sinus infections, ear infections, death
MeaslesMMR** vaccine protects against measles.Air, direct contactRash, fever, cough, runny nose, pink eyeEncephalitis (brain swelling), pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
MumpsMMR**vaccine protects against mumps.Air, direct contactSwollen salivary glands (under the jaw), fever, headache, tiredness, muscle painMeningitis (infection of the covering around the brain and spinal cord), encephalitis (brain swelling), inflammation of testicles or ovaries, deafness, death
PertussisDTaP* vaccine protects against pertussis (whooping cough).Air, direct contactSevere cough, runny nose, apnea (a pause in breathing in infants)Pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
PolioIPV vaccine protects against polio.Air, direct contact, through the mouthMay be no symptoms, sore throat, fever, nausea, headacheParalysis, death
PneumococcalPCV13 vaccine protects against pneumococcus.Air, direct contactMay be no symptoms, pneumonia (infection in the lungs)Bacteremia (blood infection), meningitis (infection of the covering around the brain and spinal cord), death
RotavirusRV vaccine protects against rotavirus.Through the mouthDiarrhea, fever, vomitingSevere diarrhea, dehydration, death
RubellaMMR** vaccine protects against rubella.Air, direct contactSometimes rash, fever, swollen lymph nodesVery serious in pregnant women—can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery, birth defects
TetanusDTaP* vaccine protects against tetanus.Exposure through cuts in skinStiffness in neck and abdominal muscles, difficulty swallowing, muscle spasms, feverBroken bones, breathing difficulty, death

* DTaP combines protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.
** MMR combines protection against measles, mumps, and rubella.

This schedule is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAPexternal icon), and American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFPexternal icon).

This chart shows the recommended ages and doses of vaccines for infants, toddlers and older children. Every child is different, so talk to your doctor or check with your local public health department

Vaccines are important for protecting your baby from certain diseases, but it’s also important to know when they should get their shots. Our vaccination chart gives you a schedule of vaccines and information on when they should be given. This prevents outbreaks and makes it easier for you to track what your baby is due for next!

New Immunization Schedule Table

The childhood schedule of immunizations is the best way to protect your child against many different infections and diseases. The vaccination age chart can help you figure out which vaccines your child needs and when. Vaccines include DTaP, Hib, chickenpox and MMR. The vaccines are safe and vitally important to keep your child safe and healthy.

What is the childhood immunization schedule?

The childhood immunization schedule, or childhood vaccine schedule, is the list of common vaccines the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends most children should receive. Immunization is a way to protect your child from getting many different infections and diseases. Many of these illnesses spread easily from child to child and can cause serious health problems. They can even cause death.

When should my child get immunized?

Your child should receive their first doses of most vaccines during their first two years of life. They may need several doses of the vaccines to reach full protection. For example, the CDC recommends children receive their first dose of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine at 12 months of age or older. They should then receive a second dose before entering elementary school (about 4 to 6 years of age). Your baby can get their childhood vaccines at their regularly scheduled well-baby checkups.

How many vaccines do children get?

By the age of 15 months, your baby may receive up to 10 different types of vaccines. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all healthy babies receive these initial vaccines. Your child may receive additional doses and other vaccines between the ages of 15 months and 16 years old. If your child has a chronic condition or a weakened immune system, their pediatrician may recommend a different schedule.

What are the different types of vaccines?

The following vaccines can help protect your child from serious infection or disease.

Hepatitis B (HepB)

The hepatitis B vaccine can help protect your child against hepatitis B. The newborn vaccine schedule includes three doses of the HepB vaccine. Your newborn will generally receive their first dose within 12 hours of birth. They’ll receive their second dose at 1 to 2 months of age and their third dose between 6 and 18 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible based on the birthing parent’s hepatitis B surface antigen status and the potential use of combination vaccines.

Rotavirus (RV)

The rotavirus vaccine can help protect your child against rotavirus. Rotavirus is a viral infection that can cause fever, vomiting and diarrhea. Your child will receive the rotavirus vaccine in two (Rotarix®) or three (RotaTeq®) doses, starting at age 2 months.

Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)

The DTaP vaccine can help protect your child against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Baby vaccines include five doses of the DTaP combination vaccine. Your baby will receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second at 4 months of age. They’ll receive their third dose at 6 months, their fourth dose between 15 and 18 months of age and their fifth dose between 4 and 6 years of age.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

The Hib vaccine can help protect your child against the most common type of Haemophilus influenzae bacteria. Your child will receive three to four doses of the Hib vaccine, depending on the brand. They’ll receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second dose at 4 months of age. They’ll possibly receive a third dose at 6 months of age. They’ll then receive their final dose between 12 and 15 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible.

Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13)

The PCV13 vaccine can help protect your child against pneumococcus bacterial infections. These infections include pneumonia and meningitis. Your child will receive four doses of the PCV13 vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second dose at 4 months of age. They’ll receive their third dose at 6 months of age and their fourth dose between 12 and 15 months of age.

Inactivated poliovirus (IPV)

The inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccine can help protect your child against infections of polio. Your child will receive four doses of the IPV vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second dose at 4 months of age. They’ll receive their third dose between 6 and 18 months of age and their fourth dose between 4 and 6 years of age.

Influenza

The influenza virus vaccine can help protect your child against the flu (influenza). Your child may get the influenza vaccine each year. They may receive one or two doses. They may receive their first dose at 6 months old and their second dose at least 1 month later.

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)

The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine can help protect your child against measlesmumps and rubella. Your child will receive two doses of the MMR combination vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose between 12 and 15 months of age and their second dose between 4 and 6 years of age. The MMR vaccine may be combined with the VAR vaccine (MMRV).

Varicella (VAR)

The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine can help protect your child against chickenpox. Your child will receive two doses of the varicella vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose between 12 and 15 months of age and their second dose between 4 and 6 years of age. The varicella vaccine may be combined with the MMR vaccine (MMRV).

Hepatitis A (HepA)

The hepatitis A vaccine can help protect your child against hepatitis A. Hepatitis A is a type of liver disease. Your child will receive the HepA vaccine as a two-dose series. Your child will receive their first dose between 12 and 23 months and their second dose at least six months later.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

The HPV vaccine can help protect your child against diseases caused by certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV). These diseases include:

If your child is aged 15 or over, they’ll receive the HPV vaccine in three doses. They’ll receive their second dose two months after their first dose. They’ll receive their final dose six months after their first dose.

Children who start the HPV vaccine before they turn 15 years old only need two doses, given six to 12 months apart. This is because younger immune systems generate more immunity.

Meningococcal

The meningococcal vaccine can help protect your child against meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial infection that can cause meningitis. Meningitis is severe swelling of your brain and spinal cord. It can also lead to sepsis, a dangerous and potentially life-threatening blood infection.

Other vaccines

Your child’s pediatrician may recommend additional vaccines if your child is at a high risk of certain infections or diseases. They’ll also provide a revised vaccination schedule if your child has missed any vaccine doses during their recommended time frames.

What ages do kids get shots?

The infant vaccine schedule starts at birth. Your newborn will receive their first shots within their first months of life. Your child may receive certain vaccines within a range of ages. The following represents one recommended child vaccine schedule. Your child’s pediatrician may follow different guidelines. You should speak with your child’s pediatrician about which vaccines your child should receive and when. The recommended vaccines by age include:

Birth vaccine

Vaccines for babies include their first doses of Hepatitis B (HepB).

  • Hepatitis B (HepB).

1- to 2-month vaccine

  • Hepatitis B (HepB).

2-month vaccines

Babies get several shots at 2 months of age. The DTaP vaccine schedule starts at 2 months. Your baby will get their first dose of:

  • Rotavirus (RV).
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).

4-month vaccines

For their 4-month shots, babies get a second dose of the vaccines they received at their 2-month appointment. These include:

  • Rotavirus (RV).
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).

6-month vaccines

At 6 months of age, your child may start to receive the influenza vaccine annually. In addition, your child may or may not need a third dose of the RV and Hib vaccines, depending on the brand your child’s healthcare provider used for their previous doses.

  • Influenza.
  • Rotavirus (RV).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).

6- to 18-month vaccines

The timing of your baby’s third dose of these vaccines will depend on their healthcare provider’s recommendation. Six- to 18-month shots may include:

  • Hepatitis B (HepB).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).

12- to 15-month vaccines

Your child will receive their first dose of MMR and varicella after they’ve hit their first birthday. Twelve- to 15-month shots include:

  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).
  • Varicella (VAR).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).

12- to 23-month vaccine

Your baby’s 12-month vaccines may include the first in a two-dose series of hepatitis A. They may receive the second vaccine at 2 years old.

  • Hepatitis A (HepA).

15- to 18-month vaccine

Your baby will receive one shot during this time frame, their fourth dose of DTaP.

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).

4- to 6-year vaccines

Between 4 and 6 years old, your child may receive the following shots:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).
  • Varicella (VAR).

11- to 12-year vaccines

Your child gets to wait a bit before their next round of vaccines.

  • Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) booster.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV).
  • Meningococcal.

16-year vaccine

Your 16-year-old should receive their second dose of meningococcal.

  • Meningococcal.

Are the vaccines safe?

Yes. Vaccines for childhood diseases are very safe. Sometimes, a vaccine will cause mild side effects such as a sore arm or leg or a low fever. A bad side effect isn’t likely to happen. Childhood diseases are a greater health risk to children than vaccines are. Ask your child’s healthcare provider to tell you about the risks and side effects.

When shouldn’t my child be vaccinated?

In a few cases, it’s better to wait to get a vaccine. Some children who are very sick shouldn’t get a vaccine at all. Reasons your child should wait or not get a vaccine may include:

  • Being sick with something more serious than a cold.
  • Having a bad reaction after the first dose of a vaccine.
  • Having sudden jerky body movements (convulsions), possibly caused by a vaccine.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What’s the difference between immunization and vaccination?

The words “immunization” and “vaccination” are often used interchangeably, but they have slightly different meanings. One term describes the specific action, and the other describes the process. According to the CDC, vaccination is the act of introducing a vaccine to give you immunity to a specific disease. The definition of immunization is the process by which vaccination protects you from a disease.

A note from Cleveland Clinic

The sight of your baby getting a shot may make you cry along with them. But getting your child vaccinated according to the childhood immunization schedule is the best way to protect them against many different infections and diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Protection and the American Academy of Pediatrics both recommend following a specific immunization schedule. However, talk to your child’s pediatrician to find out what works best for your child.

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