Vaccination Schedule For Baby In Usa

The COVID-19 vaccine is now available for children aged 6 months and older. Get your child their’s today by visiting the official Chicago site for important information on the latest guidelines and requirements.

Vaccine Chicago is the official source for reliable and important information on the CVID vaccine in the USA. With over 15 years of experience, we can help you understand the correct vaccination schedule for all children aged 6 months and up

The COVID-19 vaccine is now available for children aged 6 months or older. The vaccine is currently free for anyone between the ages of 6 months and 18 years old, with a maximum of 2 doses per person. It’s important to give your child their dose as soon as possible so that they can stay healthy!

The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) is offering the Community Vaccination Program to all Chicagoans over six months old. This program is available to all children and adults who are at risk of exposure to COVID-19. To get vaccinated, you must be an eligible Chicago resident who falls into one of these categories:

New Born Baby Vaccination Chart

Using the schedule

To make vaccination recommendations, healthcare providers should:

  1. Determine needed vaccines based on age (Table 1)
  2. Determine appropriate intervals for catch-up, if needed (Table 2)
  3. Assess for medical conditions and other indications (Table 3)
  4. Review special situations (Vaccination Notes)
  5. Review contraindications and precautions to vaccination (Appendix)

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More schedule resources

Table 1. By age

Table 2. Catch-up schedule

Table 3. By medical indications

Vaccination Notes

Appendix

Parent-friendly schedules

Legend

Range of recommended ages for all childrenRange of recommended ages
for catch-up vaccination
Range of recommended ages for certain high-risk groupsRecommended vaccination can begin in this age groupRecommended vaccination based on shared clinical decision-makingNo recommendation/Not applicable

Birth to 15 Months

VaccineBirth1 mo2 mos4 mos6 mos9 mos12 mos15 mos
Hepatitis B 
(HepB)
1st dose←2nd dose→←3rd dose→
Rotavirus 
(RV) RV1 (2-dose series); RV5 (3-dose series)
1st dose2nd doseSee notes
Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis 
(DTaP: <7 yrs)
1st dose2nd dose3rd dose←4th dose→
Haemophilus influenzae type b 
(Hib)
1st dose2nd doseSee notes←3rd or 4th dose,
See notes
Pneumococcal conjugate 
(PCV13)
1st dose2nd dose3rd dose←4th dose→
Inactivated poliovirus 
(IPV: <18 yrs)
1st dose2nd dose←3rd dose→
Influenza (IIV4) Annual vaccination 1 or 2 doses
more info icon.
Influenza (LAIV4) 
Measles, mumps, rubella 
(MMR)
See notes←1st dose→
Varicella 
(VAR)
←1st dose→
Hepatitis A 
(HepA)
See notes←2-dose series, See notes
Tetanus, diphtheria, & acellular pertussis 
(Tdap: ≥7 yrs)
Human papillomavirus 
(HPV)
Meningococcal 
(MenACWY-D ≥9 mos, MenACWY-CRM ≥2 mos, MenACWY-TT ≥2years)
See notes
Meningococcal B 
(MenB-4C, MenB-FHbp)
Pneumococcal polysaccharide 
(PPSV23)
Dengue 
(DEN4CYD; 9-16 yrs)

18 Months to 18 Years

Vaccines18 mos19-23 mos2-3 yrs4-6 yrs7-10 yrs11-12 yrs13-15 yrs16 yrs17-18 yrs
Hepatitis B 
(HepB)
←3rd dose→
Rotavirus 
(RV) RV1 (2-dose series); RV5 (3-dose series)
Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis 
(DTaP: <7 yrs)
←4th dose→5th dose
Haemophilus influenzae type b 
(Hib)
Pneumococcal conjugate 
(PCV13)
Inactivated poliovirus 
(IPV: <18 yrs)
←3rd dose→4th dose
Influenza (IIV4) Annual vaccination 1 or 2 dosesAnnual vaccination 1 dose only
more info icon.
Influenza (LAIV4) 
more info icon.
Annual vaccination 1 or 2 doses
Annual vaccination 1 dose only
Measles, mumps, rubella 
(MMR)
2nd dose
Varicella 
(VAR)
2nd dose
Hepatitis A 
(HepA)
← 2-dose series, See notes
Tetanus, diphtheria, & acellular pertussis 
(Tdap: ≥7 yrs)
1 dose
Human papillomavirus 
(HPV)
See notes
Meningococcal 
(MenACWY-D ≥9 mos, MenACWY-CRM ≥2 mos, MenACWY-TT ≥2years)
See notes1st dose2nd dose
Meningococcal B 
(MenB-4C, MenB-FHbp)
See notes
Pneumococcal polysaccharide 
(PPSV23)
See notes
Dengue 
(DEN4CYD; 9-16 yrs)
Seropositive in endemic areas only
(See notes)

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Administer recommended vaccines if immunization history is incomplete or unknown. Do not restart or add doses to vaccine series for extended intervals between doses. When a vaccine is not administered at the recommended age, administer at a subsequent visit. The use of trade names is for identification purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the ACIP or CDC.

Notes

For vaccination recommendations for persons ages 19 years or older, see the Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule, 2022.

Additional information

  • Consult relevant ACIP statements for detailed recommendations.
  • For calculating intervals between doses, 4 weeks = 28 days. Intervals of ≥4 months are determined by calendar months.
  • Within a number range (e.g., 12–18), a dash (–) should be read as “through.”
  • Vaccine doses administered ≤4 days before the minimum age or interval are considered valid. Doses of any vaccine administered ≥5 days earlier than the minimum age or minimum interval should not be counted as valid and should be repeated as age-appropriate. The repeat dose should be spaced after the invalid dose by the recommended minimum interval. For further details, see Table 3-1, Recommended and minimum ages and intervals between vaccine doses, in General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization.
  • Information on travel vaccination requirements and recommendations is available at https://www.cdc.gov/travel/.
  • For vaccination of persons with immunodeficiencies, see Table 8-1, Vaccination of persons with primary and secondary immunodeficiencies, in General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization, and Immunization in Special Clinical Circumstances (In: Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, eds. Red Book: 2018 report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 31st ed. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018:67–111).
  • For information about vaccination in the setting of a vaccine-preventable disease outbreak, contact your state or local health department.
  • The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a no-fault alternative to the traditional legal system for resolving vaccine injury claims. All routine child and adolescent vaccines are covered by VICP except for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For more information, see www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/index.htmlexternal icon.

Did you know the COVID vaccine is now available for infants, children and adults? Learn about your options and make an appointment to protect yourself.

New Immunization Schedule Table

Two doses given at least four weeks apart are recommended for children age 6 months through 8 years of age who are getting an influenza (flu) vaccine for the first time and for some other children in this age group.

§Two doses of HepA vaccine are needed for lasting protection. The first dose of HepA vaccine should be given between 12 months and 23 months of age. The second dose should be given 6 months after the first dose. All children and adolescents over 24 months of age who have not been vaccinated should also receive 2 doses of HepA vaccine.

If your child has any medical conditions that put him or her at risk for infection or is traveling outside the United States, talk to your child’s doctor about additional vaccines that he or she may need.

Vaccine-Preventable Diseases and the Vaccines that Prevent Them

DiseaseVaccineDisease spread byDisease symptomsDisease complications
ChickenpoxVaricella vaccine protects against chickenpox.Air, direct contactRash, tiredness, headache, feverInfected blisters, bleeding disorders, encephalitis (brain swelling), pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
DiphtheriaDTaP* vaccine protects against diphtheria.Air, direct contactSore throat, mild fever, weakness, swollen glands in neckSwelling of the heart muscle, heart failure, coma, paralysis, death
HibHib vaccine protects against Haemophilus influenzae type b.Air, direct contactMay be no symptoms unless bacteria enter the bloodMeningitis (infection of the covering around the brain and spinal cord), intellectual disability, epiglottitis (life-threatening infection that can block the windpipe and lead to serious breathing problems), pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
Hepatitis AHepA vaccine protects against hepatitis A.Direct contact, contaminated food or waterMay be no symptoms, fever, stomach pain, loss of appetite, fatigue, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes), dark urineLiver failure, arthralgia (joint pain), kidney, pancreatic, and blood disorders, death
Hepatitis BHepB vaccine protects against hepatitis B.Contact with blood or body fluidsMay be no symptoms, fever, headache, weakness, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes), joint painChronic liver infection, liver failure, liver cancer, death
Influenza (Flu)Flu vaccine protects against influenza.Air, direct contactFever, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, extreme fatiguePneumonia (infection in the lungs), bronchitis, sinus infections, ear infections, death
MeaslesMMR** vaccine protects against measles.Air, direct contactRash, fever, cough, runny nose, pink eyeEncephalitis (brain swelling), pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
MumpsMMR**vaccine protects against mumps.Air, direct contactSwollen salivary glands (under the jaw), fever, headache, tiredness, muscle painMeningitis (infection of the covering around the brain and spinal cord), encephalitis (brain swelling), inflammation of testicles or ovaries, deafness, death
PertussisDTaP* vaccine protects against pertussis (whooping cough).Air, direct contactSevere cough, runny nose, apnea (a pause in breathing in infants)Pneumonia (infection in the lungs), death
PolioIPV vaccine protects against polio.Air, direct contact, through the mouthMay be no symptoms, sore throat, fever, nausea, headacheParalysis, death
PneumococcalPCV13 vaccine protects against pneumococcus.Air, direct contactMay be no symptoms, pneumonia (infection in the lungs)Bacteremia (blood infection), meningitis (infection of the covering around the brain and spinal cord), death
RotavirusRV vaccine protects against rotavirus.Through the mouthDiarrhea, fever, vomitingSevere diarrhea, dehydration, death
RubellaMMR** vaccine protects against rubella.Air, direct contactSometimes rash, fever, swollen lymph nodesVery serious in pregnant women—can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery, birth defects
TetanusDTaP* vaccine protects against tetanus.Exposure through cuts in skinStiffness in neck and abdominal muscles, difficulty swallowing, muscle spasms, feverBroken bones, breathing difficulty, death

* DTaP combines protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.
** MMR combines protection against measles, mumps, and rubella.

This schedule is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAPexternal icon), and American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFPexternal icon).

Get the information you need to make informed decisions about your child’s vaccinations. Visit our new U.S. Center for COVID.

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