Vaccine List For Baby

To protect your baby, we recommend you vaccinate your child with two doses of the DTaP vaccine. This will give them protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. We also recommend you give them one dose of Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) vaccine to help protect against bacterial meningitis caused by this organism. Next, we would like to give you one dose each of pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13), inactivated poliovirus (IPV), and Hepatitis B vaccines as well.

Your child will need immunizations to protect them against many deadly diseases. The time between each series of vaccinations is called a “rotation.” Keep track of each vaccine your baby receives at immunization visits.

Vaccines are injected into children to build immunity. Vaccines prevent disease by alerting the body’s immune system to attack the virus or bacteria.

Vaccine2 mos9 mos
Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis (DTaP: <7 yrs)1st dose
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)1st dose
Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13)1st dose
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV: <18 yrs)1st dose←3rd dose→

List of Vaccines for Children by Age

Using the schedule

To make vaccination recommendations, healthcare providers should:

  1. Determine needed vaccines based on age (Table 1)
  2. Determine appropriate intervals for catch-up, if needed (Table 2)
  3. Assess for medical conditions and other indications (Table 3)
  4. Review special situations (Vaccination Notes)
  5. Review contraindications and precautions to vaccination (Appendix)

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More schedule resources

Table 1. By age

Table 2. Catch-up schedule

Table 3. By medical indications

Vaccination Notes

Appendix

Parent-friendly schedules

Legend

Range of recommended ages for all childrenRange of recommended ages
for catch-up vaccination
Range of recommended ages for certain high-risk groupsRecommended vaccination can begin in this age groupRecommended vaccination based on shared clinical decision-makingNo recommendation/Not applicable

Birth to 15 Months

VaccineBirth1 mo2 mos4 mos6 mos9 mos12 mos15 mos
Hepatitis B 
(HepB)
1st dose←2nd dose→←3rd dose→
Rotavirus 
(RV) RV1 (2-dose series); RV5 (3-dose series)
1st dose2nd doseSee notes
Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis 
(DTaP: <7 yrs)
1st dose2nd dose3rd dose←4th dose→
Haemophilus influenzae type b 
(Hib)
1st dose2nd doseSee notes←3rd or 4th dose,
See notes
Pneumococcal conjugate 
(PCV13)
1st dose2nd dose3rd dose←4th dose→
Inactivated poliovirus 
(IPV: <18 yrs)
1st dose2nd dose←3rd dose→
Influenza (IIV4) Annual vaccination 1 or 2 doses
more info icon.
Influenza (LAIV4) 
Measles, mumps, rubella 
(MMR)
See notes←1st dose→
Varicella 
(VAR)
←1st dose→
Hepatitis A 
(HepA)
See notes←2-dose series, See notes
Tetanus, diphtheria, & acellular pertussis 
(Tdap: ≥7 yrs)
Human papillomavirus 
(HPV)
Meningococcal 
(MenACWY-D ≥9 mos, MenACWY-CRM ≥2 mos, MenACWY-TT ≥2years)
See notes
Meningococcal B 
(MenB-4C, MenB-FHbp)
Pneumococcal polysaccharide 
(PPSV23)
Dengue 
(DEN4CYD; 9-16 yrs)

18 Months to 18 Years

Vaccines18 mos19-23 mos2-3 yrs4-6 yrs7-10 yrs11-12 yrs13-15 yrs16 yrs17-18 yrs
Hepatitis B 
(HepB)
←3rd dose→
Rotavirus 
(RV) RV1 (2-dose series); RV5 (3-dose series)
Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis 
(DTaP: <7 yrs)
←4th dose→5th dose
Haemophilus influenzae type b 
(Hib)
Pneumococcal conjugate 
(PCV13)
Inactivated poliovirus 
(IPV: <18 yrs)
←3rd dose→4th dose
Influenza (IIV4) Annual vaccination 1 or 2 dosesAnnual vaccination 1 dose only
more info icon.
Influenza (LAIV4) 
more info icon.
Annual vaccination 1 or 2 doses
Annual vaccination 1 dose only
Measles, mumps, rubella 
(MMR)
2nd dose
Varicella 
(VAR)
2nd dose
Hepatitis A 
(HepA)
← 2-dose series, See notes
Tetanus, diphtheria, & acellular pertussis 
(Tdap: ≥7 yrs)
1 dose
Human papillomavirus 
(HPV)
See notes
Meningococcal 
(MenACWY-D ≥9 mos, MenACWY-CRM ≥2 mos, MenACWY-TT ≥2years)
See notes1st dose2nd dose
Meningococcal B 
(MenB-4C, MenB-FHbp)
See notes
Pneumococcal polysaccharide 
(PPSV23)
See notes
Dengue 
(DEN4CYD; 9-16 yrs)
Seropositive in endemic areas only
(See notes)

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Administer recommended vaccines if immunization history is incomplete or unknown. Do not restart or add doses to vaccine series for extended intervals between doses. When a vaccine is not administered at the recommended age, administer at a subsequent visit. The use of trade names is for identification purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the ACIP or CDC.

Notes

For vaccination recommendations for persons ages 19 years or older, see the Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule, 2022.

Additional information

  • Consult relevant ACIP statements for detailed recommendations.
  • For calculating intervals between doses, 4 weeks = 28 days. Intervals of ≥4 months are determined by calendar months.
  • Within a number range (e.g., 12–18), a dash (–) should be read as “through.”
  • Vaccine doses administered ≤4 days before the minimum age or interval are considered valid. Doses of any vaccine administered ≥5 days earlier than the minimum age or minimum interval should not be counted as valid and should be repeated as age-appropriate. The repeat dose should be spaced after the invalid dose by the recommended minimum interval. For further details, see Table 3-1, Recommended and minimum ages and intervals between vaccine doses, in General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization.
  • Information on travel vaccination requirements and recommendations is available at https://www.cdc.gov/travel/.
  • For vaccination of persons with immunodeficiencies, see Table 8-1, Vaccination of persons with primary and secondary immunodeficiencies, in General Best Practice Guidelines for Immunization, and Immunization in Special Clinical Circumstances (In: Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, eds. Red Book: 2018 report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 31st ed. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018:67–111).
  • For information about vaccination in the setting of a vaccine-preventable disease outbreak, contact your state or local health department.
  • The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) is a no-fault alternative to the traditional legal system for resolving vaccine injury claims. All routine child and adolescent vaccines are covered by VICP except for pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For more information, see www.hrsa.gov/vaccinecompensation/index.htmlexternal icon.

3 or 4 live vaccines are given at the same time, usually in a single shot. More than one shot is given because it is thought that multiple doses will increase immunity.

Delayed Vaccine Schedule

This schedule of recommended immunizations may vary depending upon where you live, your child’s health, the type of vaccine, and the vaccines available.

Some of the vaccines may be given as part of a combination vaccine so that a child gets fewer shots. Talk with your doctor about which vaccines your kids need.

Birth

  • HepB: Hepatitis B vaccine. Ideally, the first dose is given within 12–24 hours of birth, but kids not previously immunized can get it at any age. Some low birth weight infants will get it at 1 month or when they’re discharged from the hospital.

1–2 months

  • HepB: Second dose should be given 1 to 2 months after the first dose.

2 months

  • DTaP: Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine
  • Hib: Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine
  • IPV: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine
  • PCV: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine
  • RV: Rotavirus vaccine

4 months

  • DTaP
  • Hib
  • IPV
  • PCV
  • RV

6 months

  • DTaP
  • Hib: This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous Hib immunizations.
  • PCV
  • RV: This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous RV immunizations.

6 months and annually

  • Influenza (Flu): The flu vaccine is recommended every year for children 6 months and older:
    • Kids younger than 9 who get the flu vaccine for the first time (or who have only had one dose before July 2021) will get it in 2 separate doses at least a month apart.
    • Those younger than 9 who have had at least 2 doses of flu vaccine previously (before July 2021) will only need 1 dose.
    • Kids older than 9 need only 1 dose.
  • The vaccine is given by injection with a needle (the flu shot) or by nasal spray. Both types of vaccine can be used this flu season (2021–2022) because they seem to work equally well. Your doctor will recommend which to use based on your child’s age and general health. The nasal spray is only for healthy people ages 2–49. People with weak immune systems or some health conditions (such as asthma) and pregnant women should not get the nasal spray vaccine.

6–18 months

  • HepB
  • IPV

12–15 months

  • Hib
  • MMR: Measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles) vaccine. Sometimes given together with the varicella vaccine and called MMRV.
  • PCV
  • Varicella (chickenpox)

12–23 months

  • HepA: Hepatitis A vaccine; given as 2 shots at least 6 months apart

15–18 months

  • DTaP

4–6 years

  • DTaP
  • MMR
  • IPV
  • Varicella

9–16 years

  • Dengue vaccine: This vaccine is given in 3 doses to children who have already had dengue fever and who live in areas where it is common (such as Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). 

11–12 years

  • HPV: Human papillomavirus vaccine, given in 2 shots over a 6- to 12-month period. It can be given as early as age 9. For teens and young adults (ages 15–26), it is given in 3 shots over 6 months. It’s recommended for both girls and boys to prevent genital warts and some types of cancer.
  • Tdap: Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis booster. Also recommended during each pregnancy a woman has.
  • MenACWYMeningococcal vaccine. Protects against meningococcal bacteria types A, C, W, and Y. A booster dose is recommended at age 16.

16–18 years

  • MenBMeningococcal vaccine. Protects against meningococcal bacterium type B. The MenB vaccine may be given to kids and teens in 2 or 3 doses, depending on the brand. Unlike the meningococcal conjugate vaccine, which is recommended for all, the decision to get the MenB vaccine is made by the teens, their parents, and the doctor. It is only recommended as routine for kids 10 years and older who have specific conditions that weaken their immune system, or during an outbreak.

Other Things to Know

  • The HepA vaccine can be given as early as 6 months of age to babies who will travel to a place where hepatitis A is common (they will still need routine vaccination after their first birthday). It’s also recommended for older kids who did not get it in the past.
  • The MMR vaccine can be given to babies as young as 6 months old if they will be traveling internationally. These children should still get the recommended routine doses at 12–15 months and 4–6 years of age, but can get the second dose as early as 4 weeks after the first if they will still be traveling and at risk.
  • The flu vaccine is especially important for kids who are at risk for health problems from the flu. High-risk groups include, but aren’t limited to, kids younger than 5 years old and those with chronic medical conditions, such as asthma, heart problems, sickle cell disease, diabetes, or HIV.
  • Pneumococcal vaccines can be given to older kids (age 2 and up) who have conditions that affect their immune systems, such as asplenia or HIV infection, or other conditions, like a cochlear implant, chronic heart disease, or chronic lung disease.
  • The meningococcal vaccines can be given to kids as young as 8 weeks old (depending on the vaccine brand) who are at risk for a meningococcal infection, such as meningitis. This includes children with some immune disorders. Kids who live in (or will travel to) countries where meningitis is common, or where there is an outbreak, also should get the vaccine.
  • Safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines are available for adults and all children ages 5 and older. Booster shots are recommended for adults and kids 12 and older. Everyone who is eligible should get the COVID-19 vaccine and booster shot as soon as possible.

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