Vaccine Schedule For Baby in Usa

The COVID-19 Vaccine is now available for all children 6 months and older. Vaccinate your child and protect their innocence. To see if they’re due for a flu shot, you can use our free vaccine schedule tool to find out which vaccinations have been recommended for them at their current age, or find a clinic near you using our Find a Clinic tool.

Protect your child from COVID-19 and other common vaccine-preventable diseases. Get the COVID-19 vaccine for your baby and give them the best possible protection against this new pandemic.

Protect your child with CDC-recommended vaccines. All Children 6 months and older are eligible to receive COVID-19 vaccinations.

Protect your child’s health for life and protect their innocence by getting them vaccinated for COVID-19 today. The vaccine is approved for children 6 months and older. Schedule an appointment with a healthcare professional today, who can help you understand all your vaccination options.

The vaccine schedule for baby in USA is now available. Protect your child’s health and protect their innocence. Get them vaccinated today to ensure they are protected from COVID-19.

List of Vaccines for Babies

This schedule of recommended immunizations may vary depending upon where you live, your child’s health, the type of vaccine, and the vaccines available.

Some of the vaccines may be given as part of a combination vaccine so that a child gets fewer shots. Talk with your doctor about which vaccines your kids need.

Birth

  • HepB: Hepatitis B vaccine. Ideally, the first dose is given within 12–24 hours of birth, but kids not previously immunized can get it at any age. Some low birth weight infants will get it at 1 month or when they’re discharged from the hospital.

1–2 months

  • HepB: Second dose should be given 1 to 2 months after the first dose.

2 months

  • DTaP: Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine
  • Hib: Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine
  • IPV: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine
  • PCV: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine
  • RV: Rotavirus vaccine

4 months

  • DTaP
  • Hib
  • IPV
  • PCV
  • RV

6 months

  • DTaP
  • Hib: This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous Hib immunizations.
  • PCV
  • RV: This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous RV immunizations.

6 months and annually

  • Influenza (Flu): The flu vaccine is recommended every year for children 6 months and older:
    • Kids younger than 9 who get the flu vaccine for the first time (or who have only had one dose before July 2021) will get it in 2 separate doses at least a month apart.
    • Those younger than 9 who have had at least 2 doses of flu vaccine previously (before July 2021) will only need 1 dose.
    • Kids older than 9 need only 1 dose.
  • The vaccine is given by injection with a needle (the flu shot) or by nasal spray. Both types of vaccine can be used this flu season (2021–2022) because they seem to work equally well. Your doctor will recommend which to use based on your child’s age and general health. The nasal spray is only for healthy people ages 2–49. People with weak immune systems or some health conditions (such as asthma) and pregnant women should not get the nasal spray vaccine.

6–18 months

  • HepB
  • IPV

12–15 months

  • Hib
  • MMR: Measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles) vaccine. Sometimes given together with the varicella vaccine and called MMRV.
  • PCV
  • Varicella (chickenpox)

12–23 months

  • HepA: Hepatitis A vaccine; given as 2 shots at least 6 months apart

15–18 months

  • DTaP

4–6 years

  • DTaP
  • MMR
  • IPV
  • Varicella

9–16 years

  • Dengue vaccine: This vaccine is given in 3 doses to children who have already had dengue fever and who live in areas where it is common (such as Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). 

11–12 years

  • HPV: Human papillomavirus vaccine, given in 2 shots over a 6- to 12-month period. It can be given as early as age 9. For teens and young adults (ages 15–26), it is given in 3 shots over 6 months. It’s recommended for both girls and boys to prevent genital warts and some types of cancer.
  • Tdap: Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis booster. Also recommended during each pregnancy a woman has.
  • MenACWYMeningococcal vaccine. Protects against meningococcal bacteria types A, C, W, and Y. A booster dose is recommended at age 16.

16–18 years

  • MenBMeningococcal vaccine. Protects against meningococcal bacterium type B. The MenB vaccine may be given to kids and teens in 2 or 3 doses, depending on the brand. Unlike the meningococcal conjugate vaccine, which is recommended for all, the decision to get the MenB vaccine is made by the teens, their parents, and the doctor. It is only recommended as routine for kids 10 years and older who have specific conditions that weaken their immune system, or during an outbreak.

Other Things to Know

  • The HepA vaccine can be given as early as 6 months of age to babies who will travel to a place where hepatitis A is common (they will still need routine vaccination after their first birthday). It’s also recommended for older kids who did not get it in the past.
  • The MMR vaccine can be given to babies as young as 6 months old if they will be traveling internationally. These children should still get the recommended routine doses at 12–15 months and 4–6 years of age, but can get the second dose as early as 4 weeks after the first if they will still be traveling and at risk.
  • The flu vaccine is especially important for kids who are at risk for health problems from the flu. High-risk groups include, but aren’t limited to, kids younger than 5 years old and those with chronic medical conditions, such as asthma, heart problems, sickle cell disease, diabetes, or HIV.
  • Pneumococcal vaccines can be given to older kids (age 2 and up) who have conditions that affect their immune systems, such as asplenia or HIV infection, or other conditions, like a cochlear implant, chronic heart disease, or chronic lung disease.
  • The meningococcal vaccines can be given to kids as young as 8 weeks old (depending on the vaccine brand) who are at risk for a meningococcal infection, such as meningitis. This includes children with some immune disorders. Kids who live in (or will travel to) countries where meningitis is common, or where there is an outbreak, also should get the vaccine.
  • Safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines are available for adults and all children ages 5 and older. Booster shots are recommended for adults and kids 12 and older. Everyone who is eligible should get the COVID-19 vaccine and booster shot as soon as possible.

Delayed Vaccine Schedule

The childhood schedule of immunizations is the best way to protect your child against many different infections and diseases. The vaccination age chart can help you figure out which vaccines your child needs and when. Vaccines include DTaP, Hib, chickenpox and MMR. The vaccines are safe and vitally important to keep your child safe and healthy.

OVERVIEW

What is the childhood immunization schedule?

The childhood immunization schedule, or childhood vaccine schedule, is the list of common vaccines the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends most children should receive. Immunization is a way to protect your child from getting many different infections and diseases. Many of these illnesses spread easily from child to child and can cause serious health problems. They can even cause death.

When should my child get immunized?

Your child should receive their first doses of most vaccines during their first two years of life. They may need several doses of the vaccines to reach full protection. For example, the CDC recommends children receive their first dose of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine at 12 months of age or older. They should then receive a second dose before entering elementary school (about 4 to 6 years of age). Your baby can get their childhood vaccines at their regularly scheduled well-baby checkups.

How many vaccines do children get?

By the age of 15 months, your baby may receive up to 10 different types of vaccines. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all healthy babies receive these initial vaccines. Your child may receive additional doses and other vaccines between the ages of 15 months and 16 years old. If your child has a chronic condition or a weakened immune system, their pediatrician may recommend a different schedule.

What are the different types of vaccines?

The following vaccines can help protect your child from serious infection or disease.

Hepatitis B (HepB)

The hepatitis B vaccine can help protect your child against hepatitis B. The newborn vaccine schedule includes three doses of the HepB vaccine. Your newborn will generally receive their first dose within 12 hours of birth. They’ll receive their second dose at 1 to 2 months of age and their third dose between 6 and 18 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible based on the birthing parent’s hepatitis B surface antigen status and the potential use of combination vaccines.

Rotavirus (RV)

The rotavirus vaccine can help protect your child against rotavirus. Rotavirus is a viral infection that can cause fever, vomiting and diarrhea. Your child will receive the rotavirus vaccine in two (Rotarix®) or three (RotaTeq®) doses, starting at age 2 months.

Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP)

The DTaP vaccine can help protect your child against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Baby vaccines include five doses of the DTaP combination vaccine. Your baby will receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second at 4 months of age. They’ll receive their third dose at 6 months, their fourth dose between 15 and 18 months of age and their fifth dose between 4 and 6 years of age.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

The Hib vaccine can help protect your child against the most common type of Haemophilus influenzae bacteria. Your child will receive three to four doses of the Hib vaccine, depending on the brand. They’ll receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second dose at 4 months of age. They’ll possibly receive a third dose at 6 months of age. They’ll then receive their final dose between 12 and 15 months of age. Slight variations in this schedule are possible.

Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13)

The PCV13 vaccine can help protect your child against pneumococcus bacterial infections. These infections include pneumonia and meningitis. Your child will receive four doses of the PCV13 vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second dose at 4 months of age. They’ll receive their third dose at 6 months of age and their fourth dose between 12 and 15 months of age.

Inactivated poliovirus (IPV)

The inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccine can help protect your child against infections of polio. Your child will receive four doses of the IPV vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose at 2 months of age and their second dose at 4 months of age. They’ll receive their third dose between 6 and 18 months of age and their fourth dose between 4 and 6 years of age.

Influenza

The influenza virus vaccine can help protect your child against the flu (influenza). Your child may get the influenza vaccine each year. They may receive one or two doses. They may receive their first dose at 6 months old and their second dose at least 1 month later.

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)

The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine can help protect your child against measlesmumps and rubella. Your child will receive two doses of the MMR combination vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose between 12 and 15 months of age and their second dose between 4 and 6 years of age. The MMR vaccine may be combined with the VAR vaccine (MMRV).

Varicella (VAR)

The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine can help protect your child against chickenpox. Your child will receive two doses of the varicella vaccine. They’ll receive their first dose between 12 and 15 months of age and their second dose between 4 and 6 years of age. The varicella vaccine may be combined with the MMR vaccine (MMRV).

Hepatitis A (HepA)

The hepatitis A vaccine can help protect your child against hepatitis A. Hepatitis A is a type of liver disease. Your child will receive the HepA vaccine as a two-dose series. Your child will receive their first dose between 12 and 23 months and their second dose at least six months later.

Human papillomavirus (HPV)

The HPV vaccine can help protect your child against diseases caused by certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV). These diseases include:

If your child is aged 15 or over, they’ll receive the HPV vaccine in three doses. They’ll receive their second dose two months after their first dose. They’ll receive their final dose six months after their first dose.

Children who start the HPV vaccine before they turn 15 years old only need two doses, given six to 12 months apart. This is because younger immune systems generate more immunity.

Meningococcal

The meningococcal vaccine can help protect your child against meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial infection that can cause meningitis. Meningitis is severe swelling of your brain and spinal cord. It can also lead to sepsis, a dangerous and potentially life-threatening blood infection.

Other vaccines

Your child’s pediatrician may recommend additional vaccines if your child is at a high risk of certain infections or diseases. They’ll also provide a revised vaccination schedule if your child has missed any vaccine doses during their recommended time frames.

What ages do kids get shots?

The infant vaccine schedule starts at birth. Your newborn will receive their first shots within their first months of life. Your child may receive certain vaccines within a range of ages. The following represents one recommended child vaccine schedule. Your child’s pediatrician may follow different guidelines. You should speak with your child’s pediatrician about which vaccines your child should receive and when. The recommended vaccines by age include:

Birth vaccine

Vaccines for babies include their first doses of Hepatitis B (HepB).

  • Hepatitis B (HepB).

1- to 2-month vaccine

  • Hepatitis B (HepB).

2-month vaccines

Babies get several shots at 2 months of age. The DTaP vaccine schedule starts at 2 months. Your baby will get their first dose of:

  • Rotavirus (RV).
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).

4-month vaccines

For their 4-month shots, babies get a second dose of the vaccines they received at their 2-month appointment. These include:

  • Rotavirus (RV).
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).

6-month vaccines

At 6 months of age, your child may start to receive the influenza vaccine annually. In addition, your child may or may not need a third dose of the RV and Hib vaccines, depending on the brand your child’s healthcare provider used for their previous doses.

  • Influenza.
  • Rotavirus (RV).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).

6- to 18-month vaccines

The timing of your baby’s third dose of these vaccines will depend on their healthcare provider’s recommendation. Six- to 18-month shots may include:

  • Hepatitis B (HepB).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).

12- to 15-month vaccines

Your child will receive their first dose of MMR and varicella after they’ve hit their first birthday. Twelve- to 15-month shots include:

  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).
  • Varicella (VAR).
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib).
  • Pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13).

12- to 23-month vaccine

Your baby’s 12-month vaccines may include the first in a two-dose series of hepatitis A. They may receive the second vaccine at 2 years old.

  • Hepatitis A (HepA).

15- to 18-month vaccine

Your baby will receive one shot during this time frame, their fourth dose of DTaP.

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).

4- to 6-year vaccines

Between 4 and 6 years old, your child may receive the following shots:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP).
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV).
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR).
  • Varicella (VAR).

11- to 12-year vaccines

Your child gets to wait a bit before their next round of vaccines.

  • Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) booster.
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV).
  • Meningococcal.

16-year vaccine

Your 16-year-old should receive their second dose of meningococcal.

  • Meningococcal.

Are the vaccines safe?

Yes. Vaccines for childhood diseases are very safe. Sometimes, a vaccine will cause mild side effects such as a sore arm or leg or a low fever. A bad side effect isn’t likely to happen. Childhood diseases are a greater health risk to children than vaccines are. Ask your child’s healthcare provider to tell you about the risks and side effects.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.