Vitamins For Infant

Once your baby is six months old, and up until they are five years, daily vitamin A, C and D supplements are recommended (unless they’re having 500ml or more of first infant formula each day). When you buy your baby vitamin supplements, make sure you read the label to check they are age appropriate.

Once your baby is six months old, and up until they are five years, daily vitamin A, C and D supplements are recommended (unless they’re having 500ml or more of first infant formula each day).

Vitamins for infants are important as they are growing up, especially between 6 months and 5 years of age. The recommended daily amount of vitamin A, C and D supplements is 1mg, 75-100mg and 5-100IU respectively (unless they’re having 500ml or more of first infant formula each day).

Vitamin A and D supplements are recommended for babies all the way up to the age of five. Not only do they provide all the health benefits, they do so in a tasty way that your little one will love – after all, they are only allowed to have their vitamins when they’re mixed in with their food or drink!

Your baby is still an infant and needs extra vitamins to help him or her grow. By giving your child an appropriate supplement each day, you’ll be giving them a head start to becoming a healthy adult. Don’t leave it too late!

Vitamins for Baby 0 12 Months

From birth, all breastfed babies should be given a daily supplement of vitamin D (8.5 to 10mcg). But if your baby is having more than 500ml (about a pint) of first infant formula a day, they do not need a supplement because formula is already fortified with vitamin D.

Once your baby is six months old, and up until they are five years, daily vitamin A, C and D supplements are recommended (unless they’re having 500ml or more of first infant formula each day).

When you buy your baby vitamin supplements, make sure you read the label to check they are age appropriate.

Vitamin supplements

The government recommends all children aged 6 months to 5 years are given vitamin supplements containing vitamins A, C and D every day.

Babies who are having more than 500ml (about a pint) of infant formula a day should not be given vitamin supplements. This is because formula is fortified with vitamins A, C and D and other nutrients.

Babies who are being breastfed should be given a daily vitamin D supplement from birth, whether or not you’re taking a supplement containing vitamin D yourself.

Where you can get baby vitamin drops

Your health visitor can give you advice on vitamin drops and tell you where to get them.

You’re entitled to free vitamin drops if you qualify for Healthy Start.

The Department of Health and Social Care only recommends vitamin supplements containing vitamins A, C and D.

But some supplements you can buy contain other vitamins or ingredients. Talk to a pharmacist about which supplement would be most suitable for your child.

Having too much of some vitamins can be harmful. Keep to the dose recommended on the label, and be careful not to give your child 2 supplements at the same time.

For example, do not give them cod liver oil and vitamin drops because cod liver oil also contains vitamins A and D. One supplement on its own is enough, as long as it contains the recommended dose of vitamin D.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is only found in a few foods, such as oily fish and eggs. It’s also added to some foods, such as fat spreads and breakfast cereals. But it’s difficult to get enough vitamin D from food alone.

The main source of vitamin D is summer sunlight on our skin. But it’s important to keep your child’s skin safe in the sun.

Children should not be out in the sun too long in hot weather. Remember to cover up or protect their skin before it turns red or burns.

Young children should still have vitamin drops, even if they get out in the sun.

The Department of Health and Social Care recommends:

  • Babies from birth to 1 year of age who are being breastfed should be given a daily supplement containing 8.5 to 10 micrograms of vitamin D to make sure they get enough. This is whether or not you’re taking a supplement containing vitamin D yourself.
  • Babies fed infant formula should not be given a vitamin D supplement if they’re having more than 500ml (about a pint) of infant formula a day, because infant formula is fortified with vitamin D and other nutrients.
  • Children aged 1 to 4 years old should be given a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of vitamin D.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is important for babies and young children, and some may not be getting enough.

It’s needed for a healthy immune system, can help their vision in dim light, and keeps skin healthy.

Good sources of vitamin A include:

  • dairy products
  • fortified fat spreads
  • carrots, sweet potatoes, swede and mangoes
  • dark green vegetables, such as spinach, cabbage and broccoli

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is important for your child’s general health and immune system. It can also help their body absorb iron.

Good sources of vitamin C include:

  • oranges
  • kiwi fruit
  • strawberries
  • broccoli
  • tomatoes
  • peppers

A balanced diet for babies and young children

It’s important for children to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure they’re getting all the energy and nutrients they need to grow and develop properly.

Get more advice and information on a balanced diet for babies and young children:

Vitamin D can help prevent rickets in children, which is where the bones do not develop properly. Vitamin C helps to develop strong bones and teeth and vitamin A is important for your baby’s eyesight, skin and immune system. These vitamins are found in everyday foods such as fruit and vegetables, so it’s best not to rely on vitamin supplements as an alternative.

Best Multivitamin For Baby

The lactation consultant, your new mom friends, the latest health news flash you read online — each one probably has a different take on vitamins and babies. So how can you make sense of all that conflicting advice? And, bottom line — does your baby really need a vitamin supplement? Well, the answer depends on whether you’re breastfeeding or not.

Do breastfed babies need to take vitamins?

If you’re breastfeeding your baby, you probably assumed that breast milk is the perfect food complete with every vitamin your newborn could need. And while breast milk is the ideal food for newborns, it often lacks sufficient amounts of two crucial nutrients: vitamin D and iron.

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Vitamin D

Vitamin D is essential for building strong bones, among other things. Because breast milk typically does not contain enough of this vitamin, doctors recommend all breastfed babies get 400 IU of vitamin D a day in the form of a supplement, starting in the first few days of life.

What about getting vitamin D through sunlight instead? While it’s true that people of any age can absorb vitamin D through exposure to the sun’s rays, tanning isn’t exactly a recommended pastime for infants. So the safest way to ensure your breastfed baby gets his quota of vitamin D is to give him a daily supplement. Alternatively, you can take a supplement containing 6400 IU of vitamin D each day.  

Most of the time, the pediatrician will probably suggest an over-the-counter (OTC) liquid vitamin D supplement for your baby. Many of them contain vitamins A and C too, which is fine for your little one to have — adequate vitamin C intake actually improves iron absorption.

Iron

Iron is necessary for healthy blood cells and brain development. Getting enough of this mineral prevents an iron deficiency (a problem for many little kids) and anemia.

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Breastfed and partially breastfed babies should take 1 mg/kg oral iron supplements a day starting at 4 months until iron-rich foods (like cereals, meat and green vegetables) can be introduced. But babies need a whopping 11 mg of iron a day, so your doctor may even recommend that your little one continue to take the supplement until he gets the iron he needs from food.

Other considerations

There are a few more caveats to consider when it comes to vitamins and babies. Talk with your pediatrician if these conditions apply to you or your baby:

  • Your baby was born premature or has health problems. He may have had less time to build up his iron stores during the third trimester of pregnancy. 
  • You think your diet is lacking some important vitamins and minerals. For example, if you’re vegan, you may not be getting enough vitamin B12, iron, zinc or calcium. All breastfeeding moms should continue to take their prenatal vitamin or another daily multivitamin.

Do formula-fed babies need to take vitamins?

When it comes to vitamins and babies who are on formula, it’s a different story. Formula is already fortified with vitamin D, iron and many other nutrients, so as long as your infant is getting about 32 ounces of formula each day, he does not need supplements. For that reason, skip low-iron formulas unless you’re directed otherwise by the pediatrician.

Do babies who are both breastfeeding and bottle-feeding need to take vitamins?

If your baby is toggling between nursing and formula, your pediatrician will probably suggest you give him an iron supplement and vitamin D. If he’s mostly taking a bottle, he may be getting all of the iron and vitamin D he needs, depending on how much fortified formula he’s taking in. If your baby is a double-duty feeder, talk to your pediatrician about whether or not he needs a supplement.

But once he starts solids — especially when he’s eating them regularly and drinking less formula — it’ll be a whole new nutritional ball game. He’ll start to get less of his nutrition from formula and more of his nutrition from foods. If you have a picky eater on your hands, you may want to talk with your pediatrician about continuing with vitamin D and iron supplements (and possibly other vitamins).

Tips for giving babies vitamins

  • Space it out. For the biggest nutritional boost, don’t mix multivitamins or iron with breast milk, milk-based formula or other milk products. The calcium in milk can hinder the body’s ability to absorb the mineral. (It’s okay to mix vitamin D into a bottle or give it at a feeding because it won’t affect uptake.) 
  • Help it go down easily. Worried that your little one won’t cooperate and swallow his supplement? Most infant vitamin drops are tasty, so your baby may gulp it right down. If he does fight it, talk to the pediatrician about strategies, like trying a different brand or switching to a more concentrated supplement that requires smaller doses. 
  • Stay safe. Keep supplements — particularly those containing iron — secure and away from children’s reach.

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