How To Cut Banana For Baby

Make a slit down the middle of the banana lengthwise. Peel only one half of the fruit and save the other half, still in its peel, for a meal at a later time. Cut the peeled half into spears and set them aside. One simple method for accomplishing this is to insert your index finger into the side of each half that has been cut to separate it into spears.

Bananas may be introduced as soon as a baby is ready to start solids, which is generally around 6 months of age.

Need ideas for the best first foods for babies? See our guides.

Background & origin of the banana

How did banana become one of the most consumed fruits in the world? It started in the tropics of Asia, where the plant originated and still grows wild. There, one can enjoy a bevy of banana and plantain varieties in different sizes, shapes, and colors, from red to orange to pink to purple, with a taste that ranges from starchy to sweet. Yet despite its incredible biodiversity (more than 1,000 known varieties exist), just one—the Cavendish banana—dominates the world market. This cultivar has a sturdy peel that protects the fruit while it travels long distances, a competitive advantage over tender types that are eaten quickly after harvest. The Cavendish has become a major global export in Africa and the Americas, where colonizers introduced similarly durable varieties that led to commercial plantations that supply the world today. If you live in Europe, Canada, or the United States, the Cavendish is mostly likely the banana at your local grocer. Fun fact: the whole banana plant can be put to use, from its edible flowers, shoots, and roots to its sturdy medicinal leaves. Even the peel is edible!

https://player.vimeo.com/video/671524660?h=7655a36698&app_id=122963Aaïla, 6 months, eats a banana half.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/437686383?h=2bbf2737a0&app_id=122963Kalani, 7 months, eats banana.

https://player.vimeo.com/video/539241858?h=2c07676531&app_id=122963Ripley, 9 months, eats banana spears.

Are bananas healthy for babies?

Yes. Bananas are packed with carbohydrates to energize the body and essential nutrients that babies need to thrive, like folate, vitamin B6, vitamin C, and potassium. Together these nutrients support the nervous system, skin health, iron absorption, and blood pressure. A bonus: bananas contain more antioxidants than many berries, herbs, and vegetables!1

Nutrients vary by ripeness. For example, all bananas contain a good amount of fiber to build a healthy digestive system, but less-ripe bananas contain more prebiotic fiber than ripe bananas, which contain more soluble fiber.2 3 No matter the stage of ripeness, bananas are a great addition to a child’s diet and an excellent snack when paired with a healthy protein or fat, such as nut butter that has been thinned with yogurt to reduce the choking hazard for kids.

Despite its nutritional benefits, banana is not without flaws. Conventionally grown bananas are heavily sprayed with pesticides, which can harm the environment and health of the people who grow and eat the food.4 5 Thankfully, peeling and discarding the banana skin can minimize exposure to pesticides—and there is growing demand for more sustainably cultivated, equitably sourced bananas.6 7 For those who prefer to eat the peel (yes, it is edible!) and food products made from it (like banana peel flour), consider purchasing organic or treating these as “once-in-a-while foods”—and be sure to wash the peel thoroughly before cooking to remove pesticide residue.

★Tip: Bananas are affordable and easy to serve—an ideal fruit when pressed for time, which, let’s face it, can happen every day. If you’d like to cut back on a daily banana habit, try treating the fruit as a backup food for on-the-go moments with children.

Do bananas cause constipation? Can bananas ease diarrhea?

Despite popular perception, the evidence for bananas causing constipation is weak.8 In fact, there’s research that suggests that bananas can help promote regular bowel movements. The belief that bananas cause constipation may come down to differences in ripeness.

Unripe green bananas are higher in resistant starches and soluble fibers, which help feed gut bacteria (great for regularity), while also containing tannins. Tannins are a type of polyphenol that makes unripe bananas suck the moisture out of your mouth. When tannins are consumed in excess, they can be associated with constipation; despite this, green bananas may still help support regular bowel movements.9

If you’re worried bananas are causing constipation, explore offering ripe bananas. As bananas become riper, the starch and tannin decrease, and the natural sugar content increases, which may be more helpful for an already constipated child.10 11 12

That said, constipation is complicated. There’s usually more to it than just bananas—like other foods in a baby’s diet, a baby’s medical history, and the natural shift in the gut microbiome with the introduction of solid food. If you have any concerns about constipation, be sure to talk to your pediatric health care provider.

★Tip: Store green bananas in a brown paper bag to speed up the ripening process. Once ripe, peel and pop them in an air-tight container in the freezer—where they’ll keep for a couple of months.

Are bananas a common choking hazard for babies?

No. Bananas are not a common cause of choking, but they are a common cause of gagging, as they may stick to the inside of baby’s mouth. However, processed banana (such as dried banana and banana chips) certainly can be. To minimize the risk, serve fresh banana and refrain from offering fried or dried preparations until closer to the second birthday. As always, make sure to create a safe eating environment, stay within arm’s reach of a baby at mealtime, and check out our age-appropriate serving suggestions.

For more information on choking, visit our sections on gagging and choking and familiarize yourself with the list of common choking hazards.

Are bananas a common allergen?

No. Although bananas are not considered a common allergen, reactions to banana have been reported.13 14 Individuals with ragweed allergy, latex allergy, or oral allergy syndrome (also called pollen food allergy syndrome) may be sensitive to bananas.15 16 17 Oral allergy syndrome typically causes mild, temporary itching, tingling, or burning in the mouth, which usually resolves on its own. Cooking banana before serving can minimize oral allergy symptoms. Individuals with oral allergy syndrome are also unlikely to react to banana-flavored foods.

Banana can be a trigger food for babies and toddlers who have FPIES (Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome), a type of delayed allergic reaction that can result in vomiting, diarrhea, low blood pressure, and dehydration a few hours after ingesting the food.18 To learn more about FPIES, see our Allergies page.

As you would when introducing any new food, start by offering a small quantity during the first couple of servings. If there is no adverse reaction, gradually increase the amount served over future meals.

How do you prepare bananas for babies with baby-led weaning?

Every baby develops on their own timeline, and the suggestions on how to cut or prepare particular foods are generalizations for a broad audience. Your child is an individual and may have needs or considerations beyond generally accepted practices. In determining the recommendations for size and shape of foods, we use the best available scientific information regarding gross, fine, and oral motor development to minimize choking risk. The preparation suggestions we offer are for informational purposes only and are not a substitute for child-specific, one-on-one advice from your pediatric medical or health professional or provider. It is impossible to fully eliminate all risk of a baby or child choking on any liquid, puree, or food. We advise you to follow all safety protocols we suggest to create a safe eating environment and to make educated choices for your child regarding their specific needs. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen here.

a Solid Starts infographic with the header "How to Cut Banana for Babies": a whole half or spears for 6 months, bite-sized pieces for 9 months

6 to 9 months old: You’ve got options! Offer one half of a whole, peeled banana on its own. Serve spears from a banana that has been split lengthwise into thirds. Or mash banana and pre-load a spoon for baby to try to pick up or grab from you. Remember, babies oftentimes gag on banana because it is soft and sticky. If you notice banana is sticking to the roof of baby’s mouth causing an intense gag, consider lengthwise spears of banana instead of a whole peeled banana. Unlike other foods that when served big give the inside of the mouth a lot of sensory feedback, the soft, squishy nature of banana doesn’t tend to provide the same type of input.

9 to 12 months old: Banana spears are a great option at this age. If a baby is stuffing and shoveling food into the mouth, try serving smaller, bite-sized pieces broken off from a banana already split into spears, which will make the pieces easier to pick up and less slippery. Slices of banana are great for pincer grasp practice, and can also be added to yogurt, oatmeal, and porridge.

12 to 18 months old: Offer bite-sized pieces—or if you feel comfortable, serve spears or even a whole banana. The exact size is up to you, though certain sizes may yield more consumption depending on the child’s eating skills.

18 to 24 months old: This is a great time to move back up in size by offering the whole banana. Try teaching how to peel a banana—a fun activity for toddlers.

hand holding a single banana spear
Banana spear made from splitting banana in thirds
hand holding four bite size banana pieces
Bite size banana pieces

https://player.vimeo.com/video/380782085?h=8418dc1650&app_id=122963Splitting a banana into spears

How often should you offer solids? See our sample feeding schedules for babies of every age.

Recipe: Banana with Cinnamon Sunflower Seed Dip

three banana spears, middle one dipped in sunbutter, sitting on a countertop next to a pile of sunbutter

Yield: 1/2 cup (64 grams)
Cooking Time: 5 minutes
Age: 6 months+

Ingredients

  • 1 medium banana
  • 2 tablespoons (28 grams) unsalted, unsweetened sunflower seed butter
  • 1 teaspoon (5 milliliters) warm water or more as needed
  • ¼ teaspoon (1.5 grams) ground cinnamon

Directions

  1. Cut the banana in half crosswise. Peel one half and store the other half in its peel for a future meal.
  2. Separate the peeled half into spears. An easy way to do this: gently push your index finger into the cut side of each half to separate them into spears. See a video here.
  3. Whisk the sunflower seed butter, water, and cinnamon in the child’s bowl (a bowl that suctions to the table works well in this instance!) until smooth with no clumps. The dip should be saucy; add more water as needed to reach the desired consistency.
  4. Serve and let the child self-feed with hands. Demonstrate how to dip and allow the child to dip the banana spears (or fingers!) on their own. If you wind up with a mess of dip and bananas, scoop it all into the bowl and mash it all together, then load the mash onto a spoon and hand it in the air or rest it next to the bowl for the child to try to pick up.

How Do You Cut a Banana For 6 Month Old?

Image result for how to cut banana for baby

At the age of six months, a baby who is being weaned using the baby-led approach should be given large, easily graspable pieces of food. You could try slicing a banana in half and peeling it halfway through so that your child can chew on it while also using the peel to get a hold of the fruit. There is also the possibility of slicing the banana into long strips that the person can easily grasp with their hand.

How To Serve Banana To Baby

You could try slicing a banana in half and peeling it halfway through so that your child can chew on it while also using the peel to get a hold of the fruit. There is also the possibility of slicing the banana into long strips that the person can easily grasp with their hand. If the strips are difficult to control, try coating them with a little bit of baby cereal.

One of the great things about bananas for babies is how simple it is to turn them into convenient healthy baby food. Whether you are using the banana as baby led feeding starter food, mashed into a puree, or even in recipes like banana muffinsbanana pancakes or banana bread, babies will really enjoy the sweetness and soft texture.

Banana can be served to babies from 6 months and up (or whenever your baby shows signs of weaning readiness).

Baby eating banana with hands.
Baby eating banana.

Table of Contents

Banana For Baby Led Weaning By Age

Banana For 6 Month Old Baby

If you’re just starting weaning at this stage, a 6 months old baby will only be able to eat about 2/3-inch to 1-inch chunk of banana (or 1 tablespoon of banana puree) at a time. If you are choosing the baby led weaning style, rip a banana into “graspable shapes” about the size of your finger. Long enough so they can bite off what sticks out of their small hand (see pictures below how to split a banana without a knife).

Baby eating half a banana.
Baby eating a banana.
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Banana For 7-8-9 Month Old Babies

Once your baby starts to develop the fine motor skills, and is able to pick up objects between his or her thumb and forefinger, you can transition from finger size banana servings to smaller chunks (bite size pieces). At 8-9 months babies can handle from 1/4 to 1/2 of a large banana per day or about 5 to 8 tablespoons of banana puree (not including other foods). You can also incorporate bananas into pancakesmuffins, bread or porridge.

Banana For 9-12 Month Old Babies And Older

At this age babies get more confident with finger foods, and they can adapt and handle an entire small banana (per day) by themselves without the skin. It’s also a great time to introduce cutlery.

How to cut and serve banana for babies from 6 months and up. Banana for baby led weaning as first food. #babyledweaning
How To Serve Banana To Babies According To Age – BLW.

How To Cut Banana For Baby Led Weaning (As Finger Food)

If it is a large banana, cut the banana into thirds or if it’s smaller – into half, then you have 2 options:

  • Splitting Banana: peel the banana and gently push it from top tip, down the middle of banana, it will naturally split into 3 finger sized pieces (this method is better than cutting it with a knife, it’s a lot less slippery).
Banana for baby led weaning, how to split a banana with a finger without cutting. #babyledweaning #banana
Splitting banana as finger food for baby.
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  • Banana Handles: another method after you cut the whole banana in half, is to cut the peel off the top half of the banana (about 1-2 inches) and leave the bottom peel as a handle.
Banana handle for baby led weaning #babyledweaning
Banana handle.

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How To Serve Frozen Banana For Teething Baby

Frozen banana is perfect for baby teething pains. You can put a small piece of frozen banana into a food feeder or make small frozen popsicles from banana puree, either way it’s very soothing for sore gums.

Baby feeder with frozen banana for teething baby.

Which Banana Are Good For Babies?

Fully yellow bananas that separate easily from each other at the stem (which are indications of ripeness) is the best banana for your baby. When bananas are very ripe, they’re softer and more digestible. Unripe and green (or partially green) bananas can cause constipation in babies. If banana is overripe, and the peel turns black or brown (the inside is still unspoiled) – they are still very safe for babies.

Tip: If you purchased bananas that are still a little green, place the unripe bananas in a paper bag (room temperature) along with a high-ethylene producing fruit (a ripe banana or apple) the ethylene gas will speed up the ripening process.

How to choose ripe bananas for babies.
Ripe Bananas.
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Related: Melon For Babies: Ways To Cut (BLW) Serve

How Much Banana Can A Baby Eat Per Day?

As long as there are no issues with constipation and your baby is also getting the right amount of breastmilk, and other category off foods, then it’s less likely the baby is overeating banana.

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As they grows up, the amount of banana babies can have will change with time, so a 6 month old baby can start with 1/3 of banana per day (about 6 tablespoons of it’s a puree) and progress to 1/2 of banana (8 tablespoons) when he/she is 9 months old. By the time your baby is 12-16 months her/she can have a whole banana and up to one and a half.

Here is a reference table of how much banana can a baby eat per day / by age:

How Much Banana Can A Baby Eat Per Day? #babyledweaning
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Banana Baby Food Ideas

  • Banana puree (smooth mashed bananas) nothing else.
  • Other foods to mix with banana puree (pear, blueberry, prune puree, kiwi, apple sauce, yogurt, baby cereal).
  • Banana porridge (simply add mashed banana or puree to your preferred porridge).
  • Banana smoothie (mix banana with another fruit and use milk as a blending liquid).
  • Banana bread (without added sugar) suitable for babies 6 months +, toddlers and kids.
  • Banana pancakes (great for babies 6 months +, for baby-led weaning and toddlers).
  • Banana muffins with mashed bananas (gluten free and dairy free option).
  • Banana carrot muffins with grated carrots and mashed banana.
  • Sugar free banana cookies (for babies 9 months and older).

Banana Allergy In Babies

Some babies are allergic to bananas. To be more exact, it’s a hypersensitivity towards a specific protein found in it. This protein is also present in kiwi and avocado and latex, so make sure to avoid those as well.

The symptoms of banana intolerance or allergy include itchiness, redness, local swelling, stuffy nose, wheezing diarrhea, gas, vomiting, or in severe allergic cases -anaphylaxis (this is extremely rare though). The allergic reactions can happen immediately or within a few hours of consuming the fruit. The exposure to the allergen can happen also via breast milk, so the mother should avoid it too [1].

And the good news is children who have only mild allergic reactions are significantly more likely to outgrow the allergy.

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More Baby Led Weaning Ideas

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Recommended

banana baby led weaning.

Banana For Babies – Baby Led Weaning Method

ThrivingNest

Ways to serve banana for babies. Whether you are using the banana as baby led feeding starter food or mashed into a puree, it can be served to babies from 6 months and up (or whenever your baby shows signs of weaning readiness). Also check out tips on how to cut banana for baby led weaning as finger food.

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PREP TIME2 mins

TOTAL TIME2 mins

COURSESnack

CUISINEBaby Food

SERVINGS2 or 3 servings

INGREDIENTS  1x2x3x

Banana For Baby Led Weaning (As Finger Food)

  • 1 banana (ripe)

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INSTRUCTIONS 

How To Cut Banana For Baby Led Weaning (As Finger Food)

  • Make sure you wash the banana thoroughly before proceeding to cutting. If it is a large banana, cut the banana into thirds or if it’s smaller – into half.
  • Then you have 2 options:Splitting Banana: peel one portion and gently push it from top tip, down the middle of banana, it will naturally split into 3 finger sized pieces (this method is better than cutting it with a knife, it’s a lot less slippery).Banana Handles: another method after you cut the whole banana in half, is to cut the peel off the top half of the banana (about 1-2 inches) and leave the bottom peel as a handle.

Serve Frozen Banana For Teething Baby

  • Place a small piece of frozen banana into a food feeder (the size depends how large is the pocket). Its convenient and the small handle lets baby get a good grip.
  • Make small frozen popsicles from banana puree (you will need 1 banana) and 2-3 tablespoons of yogurt (choose non-dairy yogurt if baby has dairy intolerance). Mix those 2 ingredients in a blender and pour into small popsicle molds. Freeze for about 5-6 hours.

NOTES

Best Bananas For Babies

Fully yellow bananas that separate easily from each other at the stem (which are indications of ripeness) is the best banana for your baby. When bananas are very ripe, they’re softer and more digestible. Unripe and green (or partially green) bananas can cause constipation in babies.

Tip: If you purchased bananas that are still a little green, place the unripe bananas in a paper bag (room temperature) along with a high-ethylene producing fruit (a ripe banana or apple) the ethylene gas will speed up the ripening process.

6 – 9 Months:1/3 medium banana
9 – 12 Months:1/2 medium banana
12 Months + :1½ medium banana

Have you tried any of these recipes?Your feedback is really helpful, please rate and leave a comment below recipe card!!

Disclaimer: The information, including but not limited to, text, graphics, images and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only and not intended for medical advice. Please refer to my full disclaimer for more info.

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