How Many Compressions For Infant CPR?

30 compressions

Pull the shoulder blades together. For a baby or infant, press down 4 centimetres, and for a child, press down 5 centimetres. This represents approximately one-third of the chest’s diameter. After the pressure has been released, quickly repeat the process at a rate of approximately 100–120 compressions per minute. After completing 30 compressions, the patient should then tilt their head back, lift their chin, and take two deep breaths.

Although you hope you’ll never use cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a child or infant, it’s important to know the steps so that you can help in the event of a cardiac or breathing emergency. And although you may have taken a class in child CPR, it’s a good idea to keep the steps handy so that the information stays fresh in your memory. With our printable step-by-step guide, you can access the child and baby CPR steps anytime, anywhere. Simply print them up and place them in your car, your desk, your kitchen or with your other first aid supplies, then read over them from time to time to help maintain your skills.Find a Class  Select a Class Type       Online Only    First Aid    CPR    AED    BLS/CPR for Healthcare    ALS/PALS    Babysitting & Child Care    Skills Sessions    Lifeguarding    Swimming + Water Safety    Nurse Assistant/CNA Training    Instructor Training & Bridging            

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Before Giving Child or Baby CPR

1

Check the scene for safety, form an initial impression, obtain consent from the parent or guardian, and use personal protective equipment (PPE)


2

If the child or baby appears unresponsive, check the child or baby for responsiveness (shout-tap-shout)

  • For a child, shout to get the child’s attention, using the child’s name if you know it. If the child does not respond, tap the child’s shoulder and shout again while checking for breathing, life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition
  • For a baby, shout to get the baby’s attention, using the baby’s name if you know it. If the baby does not respond, tap the bottom of the baby’s foot and shout again while checking for breathing, life-threatening bleeding or another obvious life-threatening condition
  • Check for no more than 10 seconds

3

If the child or baby does not respond and is not breathing or only gasping, CALL 9-1-1 and get equipment, or tell someone to do so

Performing Child & Baby CPR

1

Place the child or baby on their back on a firm, flat surface

  • For a child, kneel beside the child
  • For a baby, stand or kneel to the side of the baby, with your hips at a slight angle

2

Give 30 compressions

  • For a child, place the heel of one hand in the center of the child’s chest, with your other hand on top and your fingers interlaced and off the child’s chest
    • Position your shoulders directly over your hands and lock your elbows
    • Keep your arms straight
    • Push down hard and fast about 2 inches at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute
    • Allow the chest to return to normal position after each compression
  • For a small child, use a one-handed CPR technique
    • Place the heel of one hand in the center of the child’s chest
    • Push down hard and fast about 2 inches at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute
  • For a baby, place both thumbs (side-by-side) on the center of the baby’s chest, just below the nipple line
    • Use the other fingers to encircle the baby’s chest toward the back, providing support
    • Using both thumbs at the same time, push hard down and fast about 1 ½ inches at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute
    • Allow the chest to return to its normal position after each compression
  • Alternatively, for a baby, use the two-finger technique
    • Use two fingers placed parallel to the chest in the center of the chest
  • For a baby, if you can’t reach the depth of 1 ½ inches, consider using the one-hand technique

3

Give 2 breaths

  • For a child, open the airway to a slightly past-neutral position using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique
  • For a baby, open the airway to a neutral position using the head-tilt/chin-lift technique
  • Blow into the child or baby’s mouth for about 1 second
    • Ensure each breath makes the chest rise
    • Allow the air to exit before giving the next breath
  • If the first breath does not cause the chest to rise, retilt the head and ensure a proper seal before giving the second breath. If the second breath does not make the chest rise, an object may be blocking the airway

4

Continue giving sets of 30 chest compressions and 2 breaths until:

  • You notice an obvious sign of life
  • An AED is ready to use
  • Another trained responder is available to take over compressions
  • EMS personnel arrive and begin their care
  • You are alone and too tired to continue
  • The scene becomes unsafe
  • You have performed approximately 2 minutes of CPR (5 sets of 30:2), you are alone and caring for baby, and you need to call 9-1-1

Be prepared for moments that matter by taking a CPR class and you could help save a life

What Is The Ratio For 1 Person CPR On An Infant?

The CPR ratio for an infant child is actually the same as the ratio for adults and children, which is 30:2. That is, when performing CPR on an infant, you perform 30 chest compressions followed by 2 rescue breaths.

How To Perform CPR On A Baby

CPR is one of those things that everyone should know how to do—even if everyone hopes they’ll never have to use it. This is especially true for parents and other caregivers, since knowing CPR could save your child or infant’s life.

Unfortunately, adult CPR certification doesn’t automatically qualify you to perform CPR on children or infants, as the procedures are different.

The best way to be fully prepared for an emergency requiring CPR on an infant or child is to take a certification course that is tailored specifically to those age groups. However, we at Infant CPR believe that it is crucial that everyone at least know the basics. Today, we’re sharing the most vital, need-to-know information about how to perform CPR on a child or infant.

How to perform CPR on an infant (ages 0-1)

Here are the five basic steps for quick reference if you find yourself in an emergency situation requiring you to perform CPR on an infant (a child under one year of age).

Step 1: Check for responsiveness.

Gently tap the infant’s foot or shoulder and yell. If the baby is unresponsive, move on to the next step and call 911 immediately.

Step 2: Give 30 chest compressions.

Put the baby on a hard, flat surface. Take 2 fingers and find the center of the chest just below the imaginary line between the nipples. Push down 1/3 the thickness of the chest at a rate of 100/minute. The AHA recommends pushing to the beat of “Staying Alive” by the Bee Gees.

Step 3: Open the airway.

Gently tilt the head back, being careful to not tilt it too far.

Step 4: Give 2 breaths.

Cover the mouth and the nose with your mouth, creating a seal, and give 2 gentle breaths, watching to see the chest rise and then release.

Step 5: Continue giving infant CPR until help arrives.

CPR keeps blood flowing to the brain and other vital organs until advanced medical help can take over.

For more comprehensive training for performing CPR on an infant, register for Infant CPR’s online infant CPR class.

How to perform CPR on a child (ages 1-8)

Here are the basic steps for quick reference if you find yourself in an emergency situation requiring you to perform CPR on a child (between 1-8 years of age). These guidelines are based on information provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Step 1: Check for responsiveness.

Shake or tap the child gently. Shout the child’s name or “Are you okay?” If the child is unresponsive and you are alone, move on to the next step. If there is another person with you, tell them to call 911.

Step 2: Give 30 chest compressions.

Place the child on his or her back. (Note: if a spinal injury is possible, two people should move the child, preventing the head and neck from twisting.) Place the heel of the hand on the breastbone, just below the nipples. Keep the child’s head tilted back. Push down 1/3 the thickness of the chest 30 times. The compressions should be fast and hard, without pauses.

Step 3: Open the airway.

Lift the chin and tilt the head back by pressing down on the forehead.

Step 4: Look, listen, and feel for breathing.

Put your ear close to the child’s mouth and nose, with your face pointed toward their chest. This will allow you to hear breath, feel breath on your cheek, or see the chest rise and fall. If the child is not breathing, continue to step 5.

Step 5: Give 2 rescue breaths.

Cover the child’s mouth with your mouth (tightly, creating a seal), and pinch the nose closed. Keeping the chin lifted, give 2 breaths, watching to see the chest rise and then release. Each breath should take about a second.

Step 6: Continue giving CPR (30 chest compressions, 2 breaths, repeat) until help arrives.

If you are alone, give CPR for at least two minutes before stopping to call 911. Once you’ve called 911, continue giving CPR until help arrives.

For more comprehensive training on performing CPR for a young child, register for Infant CPR’s Child CPR class.

Following these simple steps will help you be prepared with the basics of CPR if you are ever in an emergency situation with a child or infant. If you want to be fully prepared, complete a comprehensive training course like those available through Infant CPR. These courses are convenient and thorough, and will increase your confidence as a parent or caregiver. Register today!

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