7 Month Foods For Baby

To begin, select items from the menu such as cubes of soft cheese, bite-sized pieces of pasta or bread, finely chopped soft vegetables, and fruits such as bananas, avocados, and ripe peaches or nectarines. Because your baby may not yet have teeth, these foods should require very little chewing on their part.

Your infant should have gained some valuable experience in the art of eating by this point! Try to eat as many meals as possible together because children learn a lot from observing their parents.

Your little one will eventually transition to eating three times per day (breakfast, lunch and tea). It is essential to provide a wide range of food options in order to guarantee that they receive the necessary amount of fuel and nutrients (such as iron). There is no need to add salt or sugar to the food (or the water) that is being prepared for infants because eating foods high in salt is detrimental to their kidneys and sugar can lead to tooth decay.

Keep in mind that it may take your baby up to ten different attempts before they become accustomed to new tastes, textures, and foods. There are going to be days when they eat more, some days when they eat less, and then there are going to be days when they refuse everything! Don’t worry about it; this is completely typical. Just remember to exercise patience, present them with a wide variety of foods (even the ones they don’t appear to enjoy), and give them the space and time they need to become accustomed to the change.

It is not necessary to give infants younger than 12 months snacks; if you believe that your baby is hungry in between meals, you should instead offer additional milk feeds.

Month 7, Week 3

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Once your baby is a pro at eating soft mashed foods, they may be ready to move on to finger foods around 8 months. They have the dexterity to pick the food up and release it or mash it, and will become more efficient and independent as they master the pincer grip around 9 months. At that point they’ll be able to use their thumb and forefinger to pick up the small chunks of food.

Your baby may grab at everything on your plate, but follow these guidelines for healthy and safe feedings.

  • Start with menu items like pieces of soft cheese; small pieces of pasta or bread; finely chopped soft vegetables; and fruits like bananas, avocado, and ripe peaches or nectarines. These foods should require minimal chewing, as your baby may not yet have teeth. Do NOT let them have hot dogs, raw vegetables, nuts, meats, hard candy, or sticky textures such as nut butters that have increased choking risks at this stage.
  • Introduce new foods one at a time in case there are any concers about allergies.
  • Chop all foods into soft, bite-sized pieces, 1/2 inch or smaller.
  • Watch out for choking hazards: Avoid round, firm foods like carrots, grapes, and hot dogs and skip anything like raw veggies and peanuts. Raisins and popcorn are dangerous for babies.
  • Keep up your formula or breastfeeding schedule, but as your baby eats more solids, they’ll naturally start to take less milk. Your baby needs to start eating more solids and drinking less milk for the nutritional value at this stage.

Your Baby’s Development This Week

Your baby is getting stronger and may even be moving around, whether they are sliding around on their belly in reverse, scooting on their behind, or actually crawling forward. If you haven’t childproofed your house already, don’t wait any longer!

You may notice these growing signs of motor development:

  • Your baby is probably now able to sit on their own for several minutes, without using their hands for support and they may be able to get up into a sitting position all by themselves.
  • While you offer them support, they should be able to bounce up and down, and possibly even pull up to a stand.
  • Their little hands are increasingly agile — they are getting better at passing a toy back and forth from one to the other.

You might wonder about:

  • Their vision. Your baby should be able to see nearly as far as an adult by now and can track moving objects with their eyes.
  • Stranger anxiety. You’re not imagining it: They may fear new people and situations. So give them time to warm up and reassure them if they are upset.
  • What they can understand. Your baby might comprehend more than you realize, so it’s important to keep talking to them about everything you’re doing and try to be consistent about the words you use for familiar objects.

Month 7 Week 3 Tips

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  • If food allergies run in the family, talk to your pediatrician about introducing highly allergenic foods like peanuts and eggs.
  • Fried foods are not good choices for babies. If you offer them at all, do so rarely.
  • Avoid feeding your baby juice unless it is fresh-squeezed.
  • By now, your baby’s diet should include grains, fruits, vegetables, and meats, and they should be eating two to three meals a day.
  • In addition to rice, barley, or oat cereal, you can introduce grain products your baby can grab, such as toast, crackers, and dry cereal. Avoid any colorful, sugary cereals.
  • Sit baby in their high-chair for feeding time. If they eat finger foods while crawling around, they are more likely to choke.
  • You’re not done with breast feeding or bottle feeding. Your baby is starting the transition, but breast milk and formula are still key.
  • Pureeing or mashing vegetables may make them easier for your baby to eat when they are first transitioning from a liquid diet to solids.

7 Month old Baby Food Menu

7-month-baby Meal Schedule

  • Early morning snack: 150ml breast milk/formula.
  • Breakfast: 3 to 4 tablespoons of rice cereal mixed with 60ml breast milk/formula.
  • Mid-morning snack: 180ml breast milk/formula.
  • Lunch: ¼ to ¾ bowl* of solid food.
  • Afternoon snack: 180ml breast milk/formula.
  • Dinner: ¼ to ¾ bowl* of solid food.

Food groups

Make sure you include a wide variety of the following food groups in your baby’s meals. Have a look at our baby weaning recipes and YouTube channel for inspiration!

Vegetables

Fruit

Starchy foods

Protein foods

Dairy

Smooth or lumpy?

Hopefully your baby will now be more confident exploring new textures. Offer more mashed, lumpier foods as well as a variety of finger foods. Giving your baby finger foods helps them learn to feed themselves, develop hand-eye co-ordination and learn to bite off, chew and swallow small pieces of soft food.

Babies take different amounts of time to get used to lumps, but it’s an important skill they need to learn. Just keep offering them lumpy textures and finger foods and stay with them so you can be sure they are swallowing it safely.

Did you know?

They might pull funny faces, that doesn’t mean they don’t like it – they’re just getting used to new tastes and textures!

What is baby-led weaning?

Baby-led weaning means offering your baby only finger foods and letting them feed themselves from the start (rather than spoon feeding them puréed or mashed food). You can offer a range of small, finger-sized, pieces of food.

Some parents prefer baby-led weaning to spoon feeding, while others combine a bit of both. There’s no right or wrong way – the most important thing is that your baby eats well and gets all the nutrients they need.

Should I still give my baby breast milk or first infant formula?

Yes. Breast milk or first infant formula is still important for energy and nutrients during the first year, and should be their main drink until 12 months. You can continue breastfeeding for as long as you both want. As time goes on and your baby eats more solids, they may naturally want less breast milk or first infant formula.

If you’re breastfeeding, your baby will adapt their feeds according to how much food they’re having. Formula-fed babies may need around 600ml of milk a day, but just use this as a guide. Remember your baby’s tummy is tiny and fills up quickly, so offer milk feeds after solids and don’t force them to finish the bottle.

Drinks?

During meal times, offer your baby sips of water from an open cup or a free-flow cup. Learning to sip water is a new skill and better (than sucking from a bottle) for your baby’s growing teeth.

Sweet drinks like squash, fizzy drinks, milkshakes and fruit juice can have lots of sugar, so avoid these to help prevent tooth decay – even baby and toddler drinks can be sugary.

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