Can I Take Mucinex Dm While Pregnant

The answer is yes, you can take Mucinex D if you’re pregnant. However, as with all medications, it’s important to follow dosing instructions and to contact your doctor about any concerns you may have regarding side effects or drug interactions.

You can take Mucinex D if you’re pregnant.

If you’re pregnant, it’s not likely that you’ll need to take an expectorant to help loosen your cough. Your body is producing fluids and mucus at a higher rate already, so the extra fluid in Mucinex D might make it harder for your baby to breathe. Speak with your doctor about how you can treat your cold without using a medication if possible. You might find that taking something like honey or lemon water helps clear up the congestion.

Keep in mind that even though there are no known risks of using this medication during pregnancy, all medications should be used on a case-by-case basis. If you have questions about whether this product is right for you or how much is safe to use while pregnant, talk with your doctor first before taking any action.

The maximum dosage in 24 hours is 2 tablets for the 600 milligram product and 6 tablets for the 1200 milligram size.

The maximum dosage in 24 hours is 2 tablets for the 600 milligram product and 6 tablets for the 1200 milligram size.

The maximum dosage in 24 hours is 2 tablets for the 600 milligram product and 6 tablets for the 1200 milligram size.

The maximum dosage in 24 hours is 2 tablets for the 600 milligram product and 6 tablets for the 1200 milligram size.

Be sure to follow the recommended dosage.

Be sure to follow the recommended dosage. It’s important to note that while you can take it while pregnant, you shouldn’t take more than the recommended dosage or for longer than recommended. If you’re allergic to any of the ingredients in Mucinex DM, don’t take it. Also keep in mind that taking Mucinex DM while pregnant could be harmful for your baby—so if you’re pregnant and need relief from congestion, talk with a doctor before taking this medication.

Conclusion

We suggest you talk with your OB-GYN and/or primary healthcare provider about the best way to manage your symptoms. They may have other ideas or concerns that we haven’t addressed, so it’s always important to keep them in the loop.

While you’re pregnant, you want to ensure your baby is born safe and healthy. That includes seeing your obstetrician regularly, watching your diet, getting exercise, and making sure any medication you take is safe for your baby.

Which Cold Medicines Are Safe to Take While Pregnant?

Doctors have studied many different cold remedies that are deemed safe to take during pregnancy. These include:

  • Benadryl
  • Robitussin
  • Mucinex
  • Tylenol
  • Cough drops (both menthol and non-menthol)
  • Saline nasal drops

Make sure not to take any formulations of these medicines that are labeled SA for “sustained action” or “multi-symptom.”

Which Over-the-Counter Pain Medications are OK for Pregnant Women?

For headache or backache pain during pregnancy, doctors prefer you take Tylenol. Aspirin isn’t recommended, nor are NSAIDs like Aleve or ibuprofen such as Advil.

Is Tylenol Cold Safe During Pregnancy?

Tylenol Cold contains acetaminophen, dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant), and phenylephrine (a decongestant). Phenylephrine should be avoided. Your doctor may allow limited amounts of Tylenol Cold after the first trimester.

Can I Take NyQuil While Pregnant?

Doctors don’t recommend you take NyQuil during pregnancy due to its high alcohol content.

Which Drugs Should Be Avoided During Pregnancy?

It’s best to ask your doctor before taking any medication during pregnancy. Even herbal remedies and vitamins either haven’t been adequately studied. Common medications that should be avoided during pregnancy include:

  • ACE inhibitors for high blood pressure or congestive heart failure, which can cause miscarriage or birth defects
  • Isotretinoin (Accutane) for cystic acne causes extreme birth defects
  • Methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis causes birth defects or miscarriage
  • Naproxen (Aleve), an NSAID used for pain treatment, can cause birth defects, miscarriage, increased fetal blood pressure and can reduce the amount of amniotic fluid
  • Valproic acid for epilepsy and bipolar disorder can cause heart defects and cleft palate

Which Medicines Are OK to Take During Pregnancy?

There are many medications that are safe to use in moderation during pregnancy. Including:

  • Heartburn remedies like Tums, Mylanta, and others that contain calcium carbonates
  • Anti-diarrheal medications like Kaopectate; avoid those containing salicylates like Pepto Bismol
  • Prenatal vitamins
  • Antihistamines that contain diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and loratadine (Claritin)
  • Anti-Gas remedies such as Gas-X and Mylicon
  • Cough medicines that contain dextromethorphan (Mucinex and Robitussin)
  • Sleep aids like Tylenol PM, Unisom, Sominex, and Nytol

Is Robitussin DM Safe to Take During Pregnancy?

Robitussin DM is a cough remedy containing guaifenesin to loosen mucus and dextromethorphan, a medication to suppress coughing. Both ingredients are safe to use during pregnancy.

What Are Safe Cough Medicines to Take While Pregnant?

Ask your doctor before taking any cough remedies during your first trimester. Cough medicines and cough drops are generally regarded as safe during the second and third trimesters and include those containing dextromethorphan. Brand names are:

  • Mucinex
  • Robitussin
  • Vicks 44

Can You Use Vicks While Pregnant?

The active ingredients in Vicks VapoRub are menthol and camphor oils used as a cough suppressant. Vick 44 is a cough syrup that contains dextromethorphan. These medications have been deemed safe for use during pregnancy.

To get more information about which medications you should take while pregnant, make an appointment today Huey & Weprin Ob/Gyn in Englewood and Kettering, OH. We offer specialized, compassionate care combined with cutting-edge treatments in obstetrics and gynecology.

Mucinex While Pregnant Babycenter

Talk with your doctor

Mucinex is likely safe to take while breastfeeding and during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Before taking any medication while pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s a good idea to talk to your doctor first. You may want to review this article with your doctor and ask any questions you have. Here are some questions to get you started:

  • Is Mucinex, Mucinex D, or Mucinex DM safe for me to take?
  • Which of these products would work best for my symptoms?
  • Am I taking any other medications that contain the same ingredients as Mucinex?
  • Are there other, non-drug ways to help relieve my symptoms?
  • Do I have any health problems that Mucinex could affect?

Your doctor can help you find relief from your symptoms while keeping your pregnancy or your child safe.

Note: There are many other forms of Mucinex not listed in this article, such as Maximum Strength Mucinex Fast-Max Severe Cold. Other forms may contain other medications, such as acetaminophen and phenylephrine. This article only addresses Mucinex, Mucinex D, and Mucinex DM. If you’d like to know about the effects of the other forms of Mucinex, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Q:

Do Mucinex, Mucinex D, or Mucinex DM contain alcohol?Anonymous patient

A:

No, they do not. In general, alcohol is only contained in liquid forms of cold medications. The Mucinex forms listed in this article all come in tablet form. During pregnancy or while breastfeeding, you should avoid taking any medication that contains alcohol. If you’re ever unsure if a drug you’re taking contains alcohol, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Answers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.

What Can a Pregnant Woman Take For Flu

When you are pregnant, your immune system doesn’t operate at maximum capacity, which is actually a good thing because it keeps your growing baby protected, and stops your body from thinking the fetus is an intruder. However, this comes with the downside that your body can’t ward off the viruses that cause the common cold quite as effectively. This can leave you vulnerable to the symptoms that come along, including a congested nose, cough, and sore throat. 

As we move into cold and flu season, you may find yourself coming down with a cold, and while you can rest assured that your baby isn’t experiencing any of them, you want to get rid of the symptoms quickly and safely. While colds are mostly an uncomfortable annoyance best managed by a little extra rest, fluids, and patience, you may find yourself seeking out cold medications to alleviate your symptoms. We recommend making a call to your OBGYN so they can steer you in the right direction in terms of cold medications that are considered safe during pregnancy. Here are our own recommendations on what to do if you get sick while pregnant.

Common cold symptoms during pregnancy

Generally, a cold will start with a sore or scratchy throat lasting about a day or two, followed by the gradual onset of other symptoms which may include:

  • Sneezing
  • Mild fatigue
  • A runny, then later stuffy nose
  • A dry cough, particularly as the cold is ending which may continue for a week or more after the other symptoms have mostly subsided
  • A low-grade fever typically under 100 degrees Fahrenheit

Cold symptoms usually last between 10 to 14 days. However, if your symptoms persist longer than that time frame or seem to progressively worsen, you should talk to your primary care physician so they can ensure it hasn’t turned into something more serious like an infection or the flu. 

Is it a cold or the flu?

The best way to tell the difference between a cold and the flu is to take account of the typical symptoms.

  • A cold is milder than the flu. Its symptoms come on gradually and typically you only run a low-grade to no fever. It generally starts off with a sore throat that goes away after a day or two, a cold ends with the main symptoms of a runny nose and cough.
  • Influenza, commonly called the flu, is more severe and the onset is more sudden than a cold. Symptoms include a high fever (typically 101-104 degrees F or higher), headache, chills, a sore throat that typically worsens by the second or third day, intense muscle soreness, and a general feeling of weakness and fatigue. These symptoms, along with sneezing and a cough, can last a couple of weeks or longer.

What to do if you get a cold while pregnant

Before turning to medicine, there are some effective cold remedies that don’t come from a pharmacy shelf. Here are ways to alleviate symptoms and feel better fast:

  • Keep eating: It’s common to not have much of an appetite when you have a cold but it is important to eat a healthy diet while you are sick and pregnant.
  • Rest: While this won’t necessarily shorten the duration of your cold, your body needs rest. Sleeping can prove to be a bit difficult when sick with a cold. Breathe easier by elevating your head with a few pillows. Nasal strips can also help as they gently pull your nasal passages open. They are easy to find, sold over the counter and are drug-free.
  • Stay active: If you can, do some light to moderate, pregnancy-safe exercises. It will help your body to fight off the cold faster.
  • Drink lots of fluids: Symptoms of colds like sneezing, runny nose, and fever causes your body to lose fluids that are essential to you and your baby. Warm beverages like tea with honey (which helps to suppress a dry cough) or hot soup with broth are soothing for your symptoms and cold water and juices work fine as well.
  • Eat foods with vitamin C: Foods like citrus fruits, tomatoes, bell peppers, broccoli, spinach, melon, kiwi, and red cabbage are packed with vitamin C which will help to boost your immune system.
  • Get more zinc: Pregnant women should try to get 11-15 milligrams of zinc each day, including the zinc in prenatal vitamins. Foods like turkey, beef, eggs, yogurt, wheat germ, oatmeal, and pork will also help to boost your immune system.
  • Use a humidifier: Dry conditions in your home can aggravate your symptoms so using a cold or warm air humidifier at night can really help. 
  • Use saline nose drops, rinses, and sprays.  All of these can help to moisten nasal passages, and they’re unmedicated, so they are safe for use while pregnant. We do recommend avoiding neti pots, however, as they can spread germs.
  • Gargle with warm salt water: Gargling with warm salt water can help to ease a scratchy throat and help control a cough.

Medications that are safe for pregnant women to take for a cold

Before reaching for the medications in your medicine cabinet, reach for the phone and call your OBGYN to discuss the recommended remedies you can take for a cold while pregnant. Here are cold medications that are generally safe during pregnancy.

Acetaminophen

Taking acetaminophen like Tylenol can help in the short-term to reduce head and body aches and break a fever.

Cough medicine

Expectorants like Mucinex, cough suppressants like Robitussin, vapor rubs like Vicks VapoRub, and cough drops are all considered safe during pregnancy. But again, make sure to consult your OBGYN about safe dosages.

Nasal sprays

Plain saline drops and sprays are safe and can help to moisturize and clear a stuffy nose. Most steroid-containing nasal sprays are also safe but you should check with your doctor about brands and dosing.

Antihistamines

Benadryl and Claritin are generally safe during pregnancy but, as usual, check with your doctor as some will advise against them during the first trimester.

Medications to avoid during pregnancy

Always check with your doctor or OBGYN before taking any medications – prescription, over-the-counter, or homeopathic – particularly the following. 

  • Pain relievers and fever reducers like aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen can cause pregnancy complications, particularly if taken during the third trimester.
  • Decongestants like Sudafed and DayQuil are generally cautioned against after the first trimester and only in a limited amount.
  • Avoid non-steroidal nasal sprays containing oxymetazoline.
  • Don’t take supplemental vitamins or herbal remedies without medical approval.

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