Cpr For Infant Choking

Infant (ages 1 year and younger) CPR is essential for parents and caregivers of infants.

Infants are especially at risk for choking because of their anatomy and activity level. It doesn’t take much to block an infant’s airway — the piece of food they choke on can be quite small. As soon as you suspect your infant is choking, start performing CPR right away until help arrives!

CPR is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including a heart attack or near drowning, in which someone’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

CPR is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including a heart attack or near drowning, in which someone’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

Although CPR can’t be used to restart the heart or restore a dead person’s breathing, it can prevent brain damage and death if done properly. You can learn how to perform CPR with this guide.

This article covers infant (ages 1 year and younger) CPR. Infants are especially at risk for choking due to their anatomy and activity level.

Infants are especially at risk for choking. They have a small throat and windpipe, so even small objects can become lodged in their airways. Infant CPR should be performed every time an infant is choking, as it can prevent serious injury or death.

Infants may be at risk for choking on food, toys, or other objects that are smaller than what would typically cause an adult to choke. The younger the child is, the more likely they are to become distressed during a choking episode; this warning sign indicates that emergency medical care should be sought immediately if your child begins coughing violently while eating something that doesn’t seem to get caught in their throat (such as candy).

Choking occurs when an object becomes lodged in the throat or windpipe, blocking the flow of air.

Choking occurs when an object becomes lodged in the throat or windpipe, blocking the flow of air. Choking does not always cause difficulty breathing, but it can be very dangerous if not treated immediately.

The object that causes choking may have been accidentally inhaled, swallowed by mistake (such as food), or deliberately put in the mouth by another person (such as a toy).

An object will be too large to pass through the windpipe if its diameter is greater than three times greater than that of your child’s oesophagus (the tube leading from mouth to stomach).

Because infants have immature airways, it doesn’t take much to block their airway — the piece of food they choke on can be quite small.

Because infants have immature airways, it doesn’t take much to block their airway — the piece of food they choke on can be quite small.

In fact, babies are at risk even when they’re chewing solid foods that adults can swallow. For example, a baby might choke when he or she tries to swallow a marshmallow or hot dog slice that’s too large for the mouth or throat. Some foods are safe for older children but not for young ones: Popcorn has been linked to infant choking deaths because it often contains hard pieces where kernels have burst open but haven’t yet been thoroughly chewed away by teeth.

Signs of choking include:

If you think your baby is choking, look for these signs:

  • coughing forcefully
  • unable to cough, breathe, or speak
  • turning blue (breathing difficulties may result in a light-blue tinted skin)
  • flailing arms and legs instead of crying out loudly for help

If you notice any of these symptoms, immediately call 911 and start performing CPR on the infant.

* Coughing forcefully

  • Coughing forcefully

If your baby is coughing forcefully and bringing up nothing, it’s time to act. This can be a sign that your child is choking on something. If you see that your child is coughing forcefully, try to dislodge the object yourself with back blows: place two fingers between the navel and ribs on one side of the body, just below where their arm bends by their side (wherever you can reach most easily). Give five back blows using this technique in rapid succession. If this doesn’t work, move onto chest thrusts: place two fingers over the middle of your child’s chest between their nipples (or if they’re wearing a onesie or similar garment that covers these areas well enough for you to see them) with one hand against their back and another pressing down on top of their sternum/stomach area directly above where those two fingers were placed previously. Give 30 quick presses with steady force into their skin until all air from inside them has been pushed out through those openings created by pressing downward into both areas simultaneously.*

* Unable to cough, breathe, or speak

If your baby is choking, he or she may gasp for air, cough forcefully, and turn blue. If your baby doesn’t respond to you or seems unable to breathe, it’s time to start the Heimlich maneuver.

  • Coughing forcefully: The first step in the Heimlich maneuver is to help the child cough up whatever’s blocking his or her airway. If you’ve ever had food stuck in your throat, this step should be easy—just encourage them with a few firm pats on their back while they continue breathing through their mouth.
  • Turning blue: Next comes a more forceful technique called “abdominal thrusts,” which involves using both hands to push hard into your child’s stomach between his or her lower ribs (the area known as their diaphragm). Do this 30 times per minute until the object dislodges from the windpipe—if after one minute nothing has come up yet, try massaging around his belly button area before repeating again at 30 compressions per minute for another full minute. You should keep doing these compressions until something comes out of his mouth!

If all else fails…

* Turning blue

If a baby is turning blue, it can indicate that he or she is struggling to breathe. This can be a sign of choking. The inability to breathe results in reduced oxygen flow throughout the body and brain, which can lead to permanent damage or even death if left untreated.

* Flailing arms

Another sign that your child needs help is if they are flailing their arms. This is a sign that the child is in distress and may need CPR or other emergency care, so get help immediately if you see this happen.

* Weak cry or squeak instead of crying out loudly

  • Weak cry or squeak instead of crying out loudly. It may be difficult to hear the weak cry or squeak, so listen carefully.
  • If you see a red face, the infant is not receiving enough oxygen and needs CPR immediately.

Treatments for choking include thrusts (back blows) and chest thrusts. Abdominal thrusts may or may not be recommended for infants.

The first treatments for choking include thrusts (back blows) and chest thrusts. This is a very important step in performing these actions on infants. If your child is a newborn or may be premature, abdominal thrusts may or may not be recommended for infants.

If the object is visible, remove it with fingers or use tweezers to pull out any food caught in the mouth; this will reduce the risk of aspiration if you don’t need to perform abdominal thrusts and are able to dislodge the item yourself before doing so.

When chest compressions are needed:

Infant (ages 1 year and younger) CPR is essential for parents and caregivers of infants.

Infant CPR is essential for parents and caregivers of infants. The American Heart Association recommends that all parents, grandparents, and other caregivers take a course in infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because babies are so fragile, and their survival depends on quick action.

All parents should know how to perform chest compressions on an infant. If you’re alone with your baby when he or she has a life-threatening problem such as choking or sudden collapse, you’ll need to provide this life-saving help immediately without waiting for emergency medical personnel to arrive. You can also use this skill if there’s no one else around who can help your child who has stopped breathing suddenly or is not breathing normally due to respiratory arrest (respiratory failure).

Choking is a common cause of injury and death in children. While this is scary, the good news is that choking is usually preventable. If you do observe a baby choking, follow the steps below in Choking First Aid for Infants and call 911. You can also learn more first aid skiils before baby arrives and take a Red Cross Infant CPR/First Aide class.

Choking First Aid for Infants

Parents and caregivers can help prevent situations that may cause choking in infants by ensuring that:

1.  bottle fed babies are monitored and using proper flow on the nipple – don’t prop the bottle on a pillow or other device to feed.
2. only developmentally appropriate foods are offered 
3. small items that can fit in the mouth are never in baby’s reach

Coughing is the best way to clear a partially blocked airway, but if your baby is unable to breath, cough or make a sound, the airway may be totally blocked and your help is needed to clear it. Be prepared to help baby by reviewing the steps below to understand choking first aid.

Choking First Aid for Infants
Choking First Aide for Infants

While choking is a common cause of injury and death in children, but it doesn’t have to be.  Parents and caregivers can prevent situations that may cause choking in infants by ensuring that:

1. bottle fed babies are monitored
2. developmentally appropriate foods are offered, such as smooth foods only when solids are introduced
3. small items that babies or toddlers can grab and place in their mouths are never within the child’s reach.

You can learn more about choking prevention from the newborn to toddler stages here.

Conclusion

This article has covered all you need to know about infant (ages 1 year and younger) CPR. As always, it’s important to remember that this is just a guide. If you have any questions about how to perform CPR on your child, or if there are any other emergency situations in which you think it might be helpful for medical professionals to know about the best way to perform compressions on infants, please contact your local emergency medical service provider or hospital immediately!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *