Crab Costume For Baby

What you need

Materials

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How to do it

Part 1

lobster costume DIY

STEP 1

For skirt, cut 2 felt shapes from template; sew together along sides with 1/4-inch seam allowance (on left side, stop below tab). Turn right side out and sew on Velcro tabs as shown; iron.

lobster costume DIY

STEP 2

For claws, use claw template to cut 4 shapes from felt and 2 from foam. Cut slit in 2 felt shapes for hands to slide in as shown. Stack 1 foam, 1 slit felt, then 1 slitless felt shape; sew along edges with 1/4-inch seam allowance, leaving bottom open. Turn right side out; iron; repeat for other claw.

lobster costume DIY

STEP 3

For eyes, cut pipe cleaners in half so you have 2 6-inch lengths. Poke a hole in each red cardstock disk with awl; push pipe cleaners through; loop at end; sandwich loop between disks; glue disks together. Poke two small holes into the cap using a pin. Push pipe cleaner through; glue cardstock disks to underside of cap. Draw dot on ping-pong ball. Poke hole; push pipe cleaner into hole. Repeat for other eye.

While my child is still too little to wear the crab costume, I thought others might be interested in seeing how it’s made. So here are the materials and instructions for making a baby crab costume!

Materials

  • Fabric: You can use any kind of fabric for this project, but it’s best to choose something soft and comfortable for your baby. Cotton or fleece are great choices, as are flannel sheets that you no longer need.
  • Elastic: The elastic will hold the costume in place, so make sure you buy enough to go around both arms and legs at least once more than needed (this will depend on the size of your baby).
  • Safety pin: A safety pin is used to keep everything together during sewing process

Free pattern (download here)

To download the pattern for this crab costume, click here.

You will need:

  • 1/4 yard of each fabric for the body parts (I used cotton jersey and muslin). You can also use other fabrics such as fleece, felt or even fur!
  • 1/2 yard of fabric for the shell (I used cotton jersey)
  • 2 fat quarters or scraps of fabric for eyes and mouth (I used cotton flannel)
  • Polyester fill stuffing to stuff your crab body parts with (You can find polyester fill stuffing at most craft stores like Jo-Ann’s.)

Directions: In order to make a pattern that fits your baby well, measure him/her like this: head circumference + 5″, waist circumference + 6″, chest circumference + 9″. This will ensure that none of his body parts are too tight or too loose when he wears this crab costume. Once you’ve got those measurements down on paper, you’re ready to start sewing!

Directions

You will need to cut out the following pieces:

  • One body piece. The one we are using is 25″ long, with the widest part being 9″ across. If you want your costume to be similar, use these measurements as a guide. This pattern includes a seam allowance and is intended to be printed on 8 1/2 x 11 inch paper. If you are using a different size paper or if you would like your costume to be larger or smaller than ours, trace this pattern onto heavy weight paper and then cut it out along the outside lines (not including seam allowances).
  • Two tail pieces (they are symmetrical) that are each 16″ long from their widest point down to their tips; then fold each tail piece in half lengthwise so that it measures 8″ wide at its widest point when unfolded—this extra width makes up for lost space when cutting out our pattern from fabric folded in half (see below).
  • Two leg pieces that measure about 6 1/2″ wide at their widest points when unfolded (these will overlap slightly when sewn together).
  • Two claw pieces shaped like upside-down C’s with the bottom edges measuring 4 1/2″ wide at their widest points; fold each claw piece in half twice lengthwise so that they measure 3 3/4″, then unfold them so that they have four layers instead of two before cutting them out—this extra thickness makes up for lost space when cutting our pattern from fabric folded in half (see below).

Cut out pieces according to free pattern. Trace and cut out one body, two tail pieces, two legs and two claws. Fold the fabric in half before cutting so that you are cutting a symmetrical piece.

  • Cut out pieces according to free pattern. Trace and cut out one body, two tail pieces, two legs and two claws. Fold the fabric in half before cutting so that you are cutting a symmetrical piece.

Cut out one 2″ x 28″ long elastic for the neckline and two 3″ x 6″ long elastics for each leg.

Cut out one 2″ x 28″ long elastic for the neckline and two 3″ x 6″ long elastics for each leg.

Put a safety pin through one end of the elastic, then slide it through the casing at the other end of each leg.

You may need to lengthen or shorten the length of your elastic if your baby is bigger or smaller than average.

As you can see, tracing and cutting the pattern is pretty simple. From here, you can make modifications as needed for your child’s size or your own personal preferences. For example, if you want to lengthen or shorten the length of elastic that goes around the neck, simply add or remove rows of stitches from each side of the piece. You may also need to do this if your baby is bigger or smaller than average and/or has a big head!

The elastic needs to be snug enough around the child’s neck so that it won’t slip over their head.

The elastic needs to be snug enough around the child’s neck so that it won’t slip over their head. This is important for everyone, but especially for babies and young children. If the elastic is too tight or loose, it could cause problems with breathing or circulation.

Some parents may be tempted to tie a bow on their baby’s head instead of using an elastic band—but this poses similar risks: if done incorrectly (too tight), this can cut off a baby’s oxygen supply!

If you’re using a striped fabric like I did, pay attention to which way you’re cutting each piece when you fold the fabric in half. Otherwise, your stripes will not be pointing in the right direction when you sew everything together and it will drive you crazy!

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Hem one end of each leg piece by folding over ¼” and then another ¼” and sewing close to the folded edge with a zig zag stitch or serger.

Fold over ¼” of each leg piece. Then fold over another ¼”, creating a hem. Sew close to the folded edge with a zig zag stitch or serger.

Slide the 3″ x 6″ elastic through the casing at the other end of each leg with a safety pin like shown below.

  • Slide the 3″ x 6″ elastic through the casing at the other end of each leg with a safety pin like shown below.
  • Make sure it is snug enough to keep its shape, but not tight enough to cause discomfort or chafing. If you have a harder time getting this right, consider making a larger casing or making one that’s tighter than necessary just so it can stretch over baby’s legs and stay put!

Conclusion

Once you have the elastic sewn into each leg piece, go ahead and attach them to the body. Pin them in place and then sew around all four sides of each leg using a zig zag stitch or serger. Next, pin down one side of the tail piece so that it is laying flat on top of the body with its raw edges lined up with one end of each leg piece (on opposite sides). Sew this side down first in order to avoid having any loose ends hanging out where they could get caught in machine as you sew around other side later on. When finished with stitching up first side, fold over remaining half inch seam allowance onto body side before continuing around second edge over top of tail piece until both edges meet again at center point where seam started from before starting process earlier today!

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