Crocheted Edgings For Baby Blankets

The edges of baby blankets are an important part of the design. They can be worked in a different stitch pattern than the rest of the blanket or simply finished with a plain single crochet row. Whichever method you choose, there are many options for edgings that look great and add texture and interest to your project.

A picot border

A picot border is a decorative edge that’s created by crocheting small loops along the edge of your blanket. It’s easy to do, and it looks great on baby blankets!

If you’re looking for something a little more challenging than single crochet, but not quite as tricky as some of the other edgings out there, this is a great option for beginners. If you’ve been working with double crochet stitches up until now and are ready to move onto something new, this may be just what you’re looking for.

Shells and scallops

  • Make a shell stitch. Work one dc in each of next three sts, ch 3, then work two more dc in same st as last dc completed.
  • Make a scallop stitch. *Work 1 or 2 dc in first st and remove hook from loop; reinsert hook into second st and pull loop through both stitches on needle; rep from * 3 times more.
  • Make a shell and scallop border. With right side facing, work across row of shell stitches by working (1 hdc, ch 2) into first st; skip next st; place last hdc over third hdc made previously (see image below). Next row: Ch 1; turn; skip first 3 sts from previous round’s base chain (not including turning ch); sl st over next 4 sts to form picot point on edge of blanket or sweater.* For example:
  • Dc2tog = double crochet 2 together – You can find this stitch at https://crochettodayblogspotcom/how-to-make-double-crochet2together/.

Ruffles and frills

Ruffles are a good option for a baby blanket. They can be used to adorn the edge of a blanket, or as an entire border. There are two ways you can make ruffles with your crochet hook:

  • The first method is to chain stitch until you have enough length for the desired effect (you should use about five times the width of your finished piece), then slip stitch into the first chain stitch and continue working across in single crochet. You can also add another row of decreases if necessary, but this will make it smaller than when you do not decrease. Once it’s long enough and wide enough, simply tuck it under one side of your finished piece and sew down securely so that it doesn’t come undone or slide up while being washed by hand or in a machine washer/dryer cycle.
  • The second method requires only one round of single crochet stitches! When working on a border using this method, begin with either corner at point A (the tip) and then work two rows around until reaching point B (opposite end). Repeat these steps until there is no more room left on your last row; remember that each increase adds another row! From here on out all we need now is just one more step: sl st into first ch from hk

Popcorn stitches

Popcorn stitches are made by working 5 double crochet stitches in the same stitch. You can use this stitch to make a border or an entire blanket. The popcorn stitch adds texture and interest to any project, while still being easy to do!

Openwork

If you’re looking for a simple edging, openwork is the way to go. Openwork can be done in several ways: by increasing and decreasing stitches, by adding chains around the edge of your blanket, or by crocheting rows of single crochet. Single crochet openwork is very popular with knitters and crocheters alike because it creates airy holes that make your finished product lightweight. It also allows you to play around with color combinations! This tutorial shows how to create single crochet openwork using DCs (double crochets).

Openwork can be done on either side of your fabric; however, this tutorial focuses on creating an edging that will show off the front side of your work so you can see what it looks like before weaving ends or sewing pieces together.

You have options for a pretty edging on a baby blanket.

You have options for a pretty edging on your baby blanket. You can choose from picot edging, shells and scallops, ruffles and frills, popcorn stitches or openwork. Each type of edge has its own appeal; you’ll want to consider what style suits the blanket you are making before deciding which edging pattern to use.

How To Crochet A Flower For A Baby Blanket

Materials used in this crochet

Crochet hook 5 mm

Yarn: white yarn for kids

Crochet blanket for babies pattern

crochet blanket for babies pattern - stitch scheme

Video tutorial

Writing instructions to crochet

The blanket is worked from corner to corner. The border and flowers are added at the end.

The main part of the blanket

Foundation chain: multiples of 20+11.

Row 1: 3 ch (cost as 1 dc), 1 dc into 4 ch from the hook, *1 dc into next ch, rep from * to the end, turn.

Row 2: 4 ch, 1 trc into dc, *4 ch, skip 3 dc, 13 dc, 4 ch, skip 3 dc, 3 trc cluster into next dc, rep from * to the end, 4 ch, skip 3 dc, 7 dc, turn.

Row 3: 3 ch, 3 dc, 4 ch, 2 trc into 1 ch, skip 3 dc, 1 sc into arch, 1 sc into cluster, *1 sc into arch, 4 ch, 2 trc into 1 ch, skip 3 dc, 7 dc, 4 ch, 2 trc into 1 ch, skip 3 dc, 1 sc into arch, 1 sc into cluster, rep from * to the end, turn.

Row 4: Row 4: 1 ch, 2 sc in 2 sc, 6 ch, *7 dc in 7 dc, 6 ch, 3 sc in 3 sc, 6 ch, rep from * to the end, 4 dc in 4 dc, turn.

Row 5: 3 ch, 3 dc in 3 dc, 3 dc into arch, 3 ch, skip 1 sc, *3 trc cluster into next sc, 3 ch, skip 1 sc, 3 dc into arch, 7 dc, 3 dc into arch, 3 ch, skip 1 sc, rep from * to the end, 2 trc cluster into next sc, turn.

Repeat rows 1 – 5 until you have reached your desired length.

Border 1

Row 1: 1 ch, sc. At the angles of the rug: 2 ch.

Row 2: 4 ch, *1 dc, 1 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st. At the angles of the rug: 1 trc.

Row 3: 4 ch, *1 dc into dc, 1 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st. At the angles of the rug: 1 dc into dc, 1 sc, 1 dc into same dc, 1 sc, 1 dc into same dc.

Row 4: 4 ch, *1 dc into dc, 1 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st. At the angles of the rug: 1 dc into dc, 1 sc, 1 dc into same dc, 1 sc, 1 dc into same dc.

Row 5: 2 ch, *1 sc into ch, 1 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 6: 3 ch, 1 dc into 1 ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, skip: 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 sc, 1 ch; *1 dc into 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, skip: 1 ch, 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 sc; 1 dc into 1 ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, skip: 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 sc, 1 ch; rep from * to the end, 1 sl st. At the angles of the rug: 1 dc into 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc.

Row 7: 1 ch, *1 sc into ch, 2 or 4 ch depending on the scheme, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 8: 1 ch, *1 sc into arch, 3 or 5 ch depending on the scheme, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Border 2

Row 1: 2 ch, *1 sc into row 2 border 1, 1 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 2: 3 ch, 1 dc into 1 ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, skip: 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 sc, 1 ch; *1 dc into 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, skip: 1 ch, 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 sc; 1 dc into 1 ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, 1 ch, 1 dc into same ch, skip: 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 sc, 1 ch; rep from * to the end, 1 sl st. At the angles of the rug: 1 dc into 1 sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc, 1 ch, 1 dc into same sc.

Row 3: 1 ch, *1 sc into ch, 2 or 3 ch depending on the scheme, rep from * to the end, 2 ch, 1 hdc.

Row 4: 1 ch, *1 sc into arch, 3 or 4 ch depending on the scheme, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Flowers

Begin with a Magic Circle, 1 ch.

Row 1: 5 ch, *1 dc into circle, 2 ch, rep from * 4 times, 1 sl st.

Row 2: 1 ch, *1 sc into arch, 1 ch, 3 dc into arch, 1 ch, 1 sc into arch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 3: 1 ch, *1 back post sc, 5 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 4: 1 ch, *1 sc into arch, 1 hdc into arch, 5 dc into arch, 1 hdc into arch, 1 sc into arch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 5: 1 ch, *1 back post sc, 6 ch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Row 6: 1 ch, *1 sc into arch, 1 hdc into arch, 7 dc into arch, 1 hdc into arch, 1 sc into arch, rep from * to the end, 1 sl st.

Leaf

Foundation chain 10.

Row 1: 1 ch, sc in 2 ch from hook, hdc in next ch, 6 dc in 6 ch, hdc in next ch, 2 sc in 1 ch, turn, hdc in next ch, 6 dc in 6 ch, hdc in next ch, sc in ch, sl st.

Stitch abbreviations used in this crochet blanket for babies pattern

  • ch – chain
  • sc – single crochet
  • hdc – half double crochet
  • dc – double crochet
  • trc – treble crochet
  • back post sc – back post single crochet
  • 3 trc cluster – 3 treble crochet cluster

Conclusion

Hopefully, this post has given you a few ideas for how to finish off your next blanket. Maybe one of these edgings will work for you!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *