Is It Safe to Take Multivitamins While Pregnant

Yes, it’s safe to take most multivitamin supplements during pregnancy – as long as you avoid brands that contain vitamin A (too much vitamin A – retinol – can damage your unborn baby). But, many experts say, you don’t actually need to take multivitamins while you’re pregnant.

It’s safe to take most multivitamin supplements while you’re pregnant. As long as you avoid brands that contain vitamin A (too much can cause birth defects), you don’t need to take a multivitamin while pregnant. Getting the nutrients you need from your diet and prenatal vitamins is better for your baby’s health.

Most multivitamin supplements are safe to take while you’re pregnant. Abstain from those with vitamin A (retinol) – too much can harm your developing baby.

Most multivitamin supplements are considered safe to take while you’re pregnant. However, some brands contain too much vitamin A (retinol), which can cause birth defects. If you’re taking a multivitamin, be sure it doesn’t contain vitamin A and talk with your doctor about whether or not you need to take one at all.

Yes, taking a multivitamin is safe during pregnancy. However, some experts believe that most people can get all the nutrients they need from a balanced diet. There’s very little evidence suggesting that vitamin supplements can reduce the risk of birth defects or miscarriage, though it can’t hurt for women to take folic acid supplements before getting pregnant and during early pregnancy.

Do You Have to Take Prenatal Vitamins The Whole 9 Months


Yes, it’s safe to take most multivitamin supplements during pregnancy – as long as you avoid brands that contain vitamin A (too much vitamin A – retinol – can damage your unborn baby). But, many experts say, you don’t actually need to take multivitamins while you’re pregnant.

In fact, in a new study published in the Drug And Therapeutics Bulletin researchers suggest that, while there’s no harm in taking multivitamins while you’re pregnant, you might be wasting your money – pregnancy multivitamins can cost around £15 for a month’s supply – because there’s no evidence that the tablets improve your or your baby’s health.

What is important, though, is that you stick with NHS advice to take 2 specific supplements in pregnancy: folic acid and vitamin D.
What does the latest study say exactly?
The researchers, whose conducted a thorough review of all available studies on this subject, found that there’s “no evidence to recommend that all pregnant women should take prenatal mutli-nutrient supplements beyond the nationally advised folic acid and vitamin D supplements” – both of which can be bought separately and inexpensively.

In other words, according to the researchers, special pregnancy multivitamins – often containing a combo of B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, D, E and K, iodine, magnesium, copper, iron, zinc, selenium and folic acid – offered no discernible extra health benefit to a pregnant woman or her baby.

So, what is recommended, then?
You should be able to get the vitamins and minerals you need during pregnancy from eating a varied, healthy diet.

But the NHS currently advises all pregnant women also to take 400 micrograms (400 mcg) of folic acid a day during the first 12 weeks of their pregnancy.

This is because studies show it may lower the risk of certain neural tube (brain and spine) defects your baby could develop, such as spina bifida. (Pregnant Women who’ve been told by their midwife or GP that they’re at high risk of such deficiencies are sometimes advised to take a higher dose – 5 milligrams (5mg) – of folic acid.)

It’s also advised that pregnant women take a daily 10 microgram dose of Vitamin D. (You should also keep taking this after the birth, if you decide to breastfeed).

Both folic acid and vitamin D tablets, suitable for pregnant women, are available in good pharmacies and supermarkets at a considerably lower cost than multivitamin supplements. You may also be able to get them on prescription from your GP or through the Healthy Start scheme.

What do the supplement manufacturers say?
Dr Carrie Ruxton, a dietician at the Health Supplements Information Service, has pretty much rejected the new study’s findings. She told The Guardian that just because multivitamins don’t produce clinical effects, it doesn’t mean they aren’t useful in combatting “dietary gaps” for pregnant women who aren’t eating the right foods in pregnancy.

In other words, if your diet’s a bit unvaried or not as healthy as it should be, Dr Ruxton thinks pregnancy vitamins might be a way to making sure you’re getting all the vitamins and minerals you need.

So what should I do?
It’s totally up to YOU whether or not you want to take multivitamin supplements during your pregnancy. They’re safe, as long as you avoid ones containing vitamin A.

But all the current evidence suggests that they’re not essential, so as long as you make sure you’re getting folic acid and vitamin D, you can save yourself a pretty penny by not taking anything else.

If you’re ever in doubt about what’s right for you, get in touch with your midwife or GP.

Is Vitamin C and Zinc Safe During Pregnancy

If you are pregnant, or planning a pregnancy, you need to be careful about taking vitamins or any other type of supplements. Some can do more harm than good, so it’s always best to check with your doctor before taking supplements.

What are vitamins and supplements?
Your body needs a variety of nutrients for good health: vitamins, minerals, protein, carbohydrates, fats and fibre.

Vitamins are organic compounds needed in small amounts that your body can’t make for itself. Apart from vitamin D, which your skin makes from sunlight, most of the vitamins you need come from food.

Dietary supplements are complementary medicines which contain nutrients that may fill a deficiency (a gap) in your diet. Examples include multivitamins, single minerals, fish oil capsules and herbal supplements.

Essential vitamins and minerals in pregnancy
Good nutrition in pregnancy is vital for the healthy growth and development of your baby. You need to consume enough nutrients to meet your baby’s needs, as well as your own.

When you’re pregnant, you need more of some nutrients, including protein, folate, iodine, iron and some vitamins.

folate (called ‘folic acid’ when in supplement form) helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida when taken at least 1 month before conception and throughout the first 3 months of pregnancy
iodine is needed for brain and nervous system development
iron helps prevent anaemia in the mother, as well as low birth weight in the baby
Vitamin B12 and vitamin D are also particularly important since they support the development of the baby’s nervous system (B12) and skeleton (D). Adequate vitamin C intake also helps improve the adsorption of iron from your diet.

Do I need to take supplements?
It’s recommended that all pregnant women in Australia take folic acid, iodine and vitamin D supplements.

Having a healthy diet is important and should provide you with the other nutrients you need. Check the Australian Dietary Guidelines for more advice. However, some pregnant women may need supplements of other nutrients besides folic acid, iodine and vitamin D.

If you have a known deficiency, your doctor might advise you to take a supplement. For example:

if you are vegetarian or vegan and not getting enough vitamin B12
if you don’t get enough calcium, which is vital for bone health, from dairy or other calcium-rich foods
if you are low in iron
if you may be low in omega-3 fatty acids, e.g. if you eat very little seafood
If you’re not sure whether you need a supplement, talk to your doctor.

Multivitamins in pregnancy
A multivitamin is a combination of different vitamins and minerals, usually taken as a tablet. Some multivitamins are designed especially for pregnant women (prenatal multivitamins). But they are not a substitute for a nutritious diet. It’s important to eat healthily even if you’re taking prenatal multivitamins.

If you’re pregnant, avoid taking multivitamins that are not designed for pregnancy.

Take care with certain vitamins
Your body only needs a small amount of each nutrient, and higher amounts are not necessarily better. In fact, consuming more than you need can sometimes cause harm.

For example, high doses of vitamin A, vitamin C, or vitamin E can be dangerous. It’s best not to take these vitamins as supplements in pregnancy.

It’s also best to avoid foods that may be very high in vitamin A, including liver and liver products such as pâté.

Just as you need to check with your doctor before you take any medicines while pregnant, it’s best to talk to your doctor before taking any supplements.

Other supplements in pregnancy
Other than folic acid, vitamin D and iodine and any supplement prescribed for you by your doctor, there is limited evidence to support the use of supplements during pregnancy.

Emerging research has shown that omega-3 supplements during pregnancy might help reduce the risk of premature birth, and that probiotics might help control blood glucose levels in pregnancy. But it’s not clear whether the benefits of taking these supplements outweigh any possible harms. Until there is better evidence available, it’s best to avoid them unless prescribed by your doctor — particularly in the first trimester of pregnancy.

Because nutritional supplements are classed as ‘complementary medicines’, they are not scrutinised or regulated as much as other medicines.

Is It Safe to Take Women’s Multivitamins While Pregnant

It’s safe to take most multivitamin supplements when you’re pregnant. But, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends that women get their vitamins from food first, and only turn to supplements if they can’t get the nutrients they need through a balanced diet.

Yes, it’s safe to take most multivitamin supplements during pregnancy – as long as you avoid brands that contain vitamin A (too much vitamin A – retinol – can damage your unborn baby). But, many experts say, you don’t actually need to take multivitamins while you’re pregnant.

Contrary to popular belief, most women don’t need to take multivitamins during their pregnancy. But there’s no harm in taking them – as long as you avoid brands that contain vitamin A (too much can damage your unborn baby).

For the most part, yes, it’s safe to continue taking your multivitamin when you’re pregnant. But before you start taking any vitamins or supplements, check with your doctor first. You’ll want to avoid brands that contain high levels of vitamin A (more than 2,500 international units or IU). For example, some prenatal vitamins contain retinol – which is a form of vitamin A – since it also supports bone development and vision.

Can You Take Normal Multivitamins When Pregnant

Yes, it’s safe to take multivitamin supplements during pregnancy – but many experts say you don’t actually need to take a multivitamin. Most pregnant women get all the nutrients they need from their foods and other supplements. However, if you do decide to take one, choose one that has no more than 0.4 mg of vitamin A (the recommended maximum amount for pregnant women).

Yes, it’s safe to take most multivitamin supplements during pregnancy – as long as you avoid brands that contain vitamin A (too much vitamin A – retinol – can damage your unborn baby). But, many experts say, you don’t actually need to take multivitamins while you’re pregnant.

To be clear, most experts agree it’s safe to use most multivitamins during pregnancy, as long as the pill doesn’t contain too much vitamin A (retinol), which could harm your baby. Some studies suggest that prenatal vitamins may even help prevent certain birth defects like cleft palate and low birth weight. But many women get all the nutrients they need from eating a healthy diet, so you might not actually need to take them at all.

You probably took a multivitamin every day before you got pregnant – but now you’re wondering if you need to continue taking the pill, and if so, which one. Many experts say it’s safe to continue the daily habit – though it’s important to find a brand without high doses of vitamin A.

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