Medicine For Cough And Colds For Baby

Thanks for stopping by. To help treat your baby’s cold:1.”Give a Little Honey”. It soothes sore throats and eases coughs.2.”Increase Fluids”. When your child isn’t feeling well, give more drinks than usual.

Increase Fluids. When your child isn’t feeling well, give more drinks than usual. Increase fluids helps thin secretions and relieve congestion. The goal is to drink at least 8-10 glasses of fluid a day. A general rule is one ounce for every year of age for infants and children under the age of 6, two ounces for every year over 6 years old. Even when the body feels hot, it’s important to encourage children to keep drinking up so they can flush out those germs!

How can I Treat my Baby’s Cough and Cold?

Lifestyle and home remedies

  1. Offer plenty of fluids. Liquids are important to avoid dehydration. …
  2. Suction your baby’s nose. Keep your baby’s nasal passages clear with a rubber-bulb syringe. …
  3. Try nasal saline drops. …
  4. Moisten the air.

Most of the time, colds and coughs are caused by viruses and need to run their course. Help your baby feel better by: increasing fluids, give a little honey and wash hands often

If your child is suffering from a cold, encourage him or her to drink more fluids.  Feed them small amounts of honey, which will soothe the throat and ease a cough.

When your baby is sick, focus on keeping fluids up and giving a little sweet treat to soothe his throat.

cough and colds for baby is just what the doctor ordered. Coughs, runny noses and sore throats can be relieved with a little honey.

Best Syrup For Cold and Cough for Child

When you have a cough or cold, you might reach for over-the-counter (OTC) drugs to ease your symptoms. But you can’t do that for babies or toddlers. Cough and cold medicines that are safe for grownups can cause serious side effects — even life-threatening ones — in children under age 2.

If your baby or toddler is sniffling or coughing, try these methods. They’re all drug-free and safe for the tiniest of patients:

Try Saline Drops

When your child’s nose is stuffy, they may have trouble breathing, sleeping, and eating. Saline nasal drops can thin the mucus in their nose and shrink swollen airways. Use them two or three times per day; any more often could make their nose sore. Nasal saline gel can be used to calm congestion.

Saline drops may make it easier to remove mucus from your child’s nose. For babies, try a suction bulb or nasal aspirator. If your toddler can blow their nose with your help, give that a try.

Increase Fluids

When your child isn’t feeling well, give more drinks than usual. Extra fluids can thin out their mucus so their nose won’t be as stuffy and they’ll cough up all that gunk more easily.

Most drinks, like water, juice, and milk, are fine. Warm liquids like chicken soup, or apple juice can soothe a sore throat. Be sure they’re warm, not hot, to avoid burns. You can also offer an oral rehydration solution such as Pedialyte, or popsicles.

Babies under 6 months should only drink breast milk or formula, not water or juice. But you may offer more milk than usual for coughs or colds.

Give a Little Honey

It soothes sore throats and eases coughs. It may even work better for children than OTC cough medicines. Give your child 1/2 teaspoon of honey before bedtime. But never give it to a child less than a year old. It can make them very ill.

Use a Humidifier

Moisture in the air makes it easier to breathe, so run a humidifier in your child’s bedroom at night. Cool-mist models are safer than those that produce steam. Follow cleaning instructions on the device to prevent mold.


SUGGESTED

  • https://1e39fff9fae4d9e81eac1c99d768881b.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html
  • https://1e39fff9fae4d9e81eac1c99d768881b.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Lower Fevers

Some colds and coughs come with a slight fever. If your baby or toddler has a fever, follow these steps:

  • Babies under 1 month: Call your pediatrician. Fever isn’t normal.
  • Babies under 3 months: Call the doctor for advice.
  • Babies 3 to 6 months: Give acetaminophen every 4 to 6 hours as needed. Follow dosage guidelines closely, and only use the syringe that came with the medicine, not a household spoon.
  • Babies 6 months or older and toddlers: Give acetaminophen every 4 to 6 hours or ibuprofen every 6 to 8 hours. Don’t give both drugs at the same time.

Serve Easy-to-Swallow Foods

Babies and toddlers with scratchy, sore throats often don’t want to eat because it hurts to swallow. Feed them foods that go down more easily.

Toddlers and babies who eat solids may prefer soft, smooth foods. Try ice cream, ice pops, flavored gelatin, pudding, yogurt, or applesauce. If they prefer warmer foods, try chicken broth or freshly made pudding. Babies 6 months and younger should stick with breast milk or baby formula.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *