Milk Chart For Baby

Milk diets can be very healthy for young babies. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that newborns receive all their calories and nutrition from breast milk or formula. Here’s a tentative breakdown of newborn feeding patterns.’

Breast milk or formula is the best source of nutrition and calories for newborns. Newborns typically feed 8 to 12 times in a 24-hour period, usually every two to three hours. As they get older and start eating more solid foods, your baby will likely decrease feedings to 6 to 8 times per day.

How do I Calculate How Much Milk my Baby Needs?

Image result for milk chart for baby

Take your baby’s weight in pounds and multiply that number by 2.5 (8.25 x 2.5 = 20.6 ounces). This figure represents how many ounces of breast milk your baby should be getting in one day. Based on the example above, the baby should be taking in about 20.6 ounces of breast milk in a 24-hour period.

Breast milk is the perfect food for newborns, but we all know that breastfeeding isn’t always easy. Newborn Feeding Patterns are a vital way to track your baby’s weight, length and head circumference through the first year.

At this stage of life, it’s important for your newborn to get all their nutrition from breast milk or formula. As they grow, aim to feed your baby at least 8 times a day, including two nighttime feedings. This will help keep your baby satisfied and calm.

Newborns feed every 1 to 3 hours for about 10 minutes at a time. Some will sleep longer between feedings, but most newborns wake for feedings every few hours during the day and night. Be sure to keep bottles at room temperature before feeding and place them in a bottle warmer so that they arrive at body temperature.

Breastmilk is the perfect food for newborns. It provides all the nutrition, protein and fat your baby needs to grow. In fact, your breastmilk contains immune factors that help protect your baby against infection. Many newborns may need to be fed every 2-3 hours during the night until around six months of age, though this may vary depending on your baby’s size, weight and frequency of feeding.

Baby Feeding Schedule by Age

If you breastfeed, you don’t really know exactly how much breast milk your newborn is getting each time they nurse. Essentially, you let them nurse for a set amount of time or until they seem to be full and/or your breasts are empty. Typically, that’s the perfect amount. However, if you’re not going to put them to the breast for a feeding or you prefer to pump and give your baby breastmilk in a bottle regularly, it’s important to know how much breastmilk to put in a bottle for each feeding.

Learn more about how much breastmilk a newborn should eat, including our chart to help you figure out how much they need at each feeding.

Calculating Optimal Amounts

You want to make sure that you’re not underfeeding or overfeeding your baby when you give them a bottle. Here’s a 3-step calculation that can help you figure out approximately how much breast milk your baby should take at each feeding.

Equation

Your baby’s weight in pounds x 2.5 / 8 = Ounces of breast milk per bottle

If you are using milliliters rather than ounces per bottle, multiply the result by 30.

Step 1: Convert Your Baby’s Weight to Pounds

One pound equals 16 ounces (don’t forget to add those extra ounces). To convert the extra ounces into pounds, divide the ounces by 16. For example, if your baby weighs 8 pounds 4 ounces, this equals 8.25 pounds.

If you are using kilograms, multiply your baby’s weight in kilograms by 2.2 to get their weight in pounds.

Using the example above, a baby weighing 3.74 kilograms converts to 8.25 pounds (3.74 kg x 2.2 = 8.25 pounds).

Step 2: Multiply by 2.5

Experts recommend 2.5 ounces of breast milk daily per pound of body weight for babies up to 10 pounds.1

Take your baby’s weight in pounds and multiply that number by 2.5 (8.25 x 2.5 = 20.6 ounces). This figure represents how many ounces of breast milk your baby should be getting in one day.

Based on the example above, the baby should be taking in about 20.6 ounces of breast milk in a 24-hour period.

Step 3: Divide by 8

Finally, take the total number of ounces per day and divide it by how many feedings your baby will get in one day. A newborn or young infant should be eating at least every 3 hours (eight times a day).2

Take the number you calculated and divide it by 8 (20.6 / 8 = 2.6 ounces).

If you prefer to use milliliters, remember that one ounce = 30 ml. In this case, the baby should be getting approximately 2.6 ounces x 30 (or 78 ml) of breast milk at each feeding.

You can put 3 ounces (or 90 ml) of breast milk in the bottle to feed a baby who weighs 8 lbs 4 oz (3.74 kg). 

How Much Breastmilk Should a Newborn Eat Chart
Weight in pounds5.05.56.06.57.0 7.58.08.59.09.510.0
Ounces per feeding1.51.71.92.02.22.32.52.72.83.03.1
Millimeters per feeding4652566166707580848994

Ideal Daily Quantities

The first day or two after birth, your baby won’t get much breast milk since you’re only producing a small amount of colostrum.2 That said, any amount of colostrum that you can pump and give your baby is beneficial.

Between the second and sixth day, your milk production will increase. Your newborn will probably take about 2 to 4 ounces every three to four hours (14 to 28 ounces per day). From 2 to 5 months of age, your baby will take an average of 5 to 7 ounces every four to five hours (25 to 26 oz of breast milk each day).3 

Adjusting Amounts per Bottle

These calculations are just an estimate of the amount of breast milk that your baby should be getting at a minimum of every 3 hours. Some babies might be interested in taking more.

As your baby grows and gains weight you will need to adjust your calculations. You will also need to adjust the amount of breast milk that you put in a bottle when you increase the time between feedings.1

For example, if your baby goes from taking a bottle every 3 hours to every 4 hours, you will need to increase the amount of breast milk in each bottle.

If your baby was taking between 3 and 3 1/2 ounces every 3 hours (eight times a day), adjust the amount of breast milk in the bottle to approximately 4 1/2 ounces every 4 hours (six times a day).

If you have any questions or concerns about your baby’s feeding schedule or nutritional needs, talk to your pediatrician.

Storing Breast Milk

If you will be collecting and freezing your breast milk to bottle feed your baby, it’s better to store your milk in 2- to 4-ounce portions. This is especially true when your baby is younger and not taking large amounts at each feeding.

Storing breast milk in smaller amounts prevents waste. It’s easy to thaw an extra 2 ounces if you need it, but if you thaw and warm a container with 6 ounces of breast milk and your baby only takes 4 ounces, you’ll have to feed it within two hours or throw the extra away.4

Once your baby gets older and is taking more at each feeding, you can store larger amounts in each container.

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