Pfizer Booster Pregnant

Vaccines work by training your immune system to recognize the pathogen (usually a virus) so it can better fight off the disease. Over time, this process means that people are less likely to get sick from a particular infection. That’s why vaccines for some diseases are very effective at preventing illness. But whether a vaccine is highly effective or not depends on several factors: how many doses you need, how long it lasts, and whether there’s a booster available. For example, the flu shot only protects you against one strain of flu for a year, but the measles vaccine protects you for life and doesn’t require any boosters. The COVID-19 vaccine may follow a similar pattern. Pfizer had begun developing another vaccine to attempt to track the first, which was a huge success but only worked for half of those vaccinated. If this new one works, people could be inoculated in two shots rather than three—and they’d be twice as effective at protecting against COVID-19 as well!

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Pfizer had begun developing another vaccine to attempt to track the first, which was a huge success but only worked for half of those vaccinated. If this new one works, people could be inoculated in two shots rather than three.

Pfizer had begun developing another vaccine to attempt to track the first, which was a huge success but only worked for half of those vaccinated. If this new one works, people could be inoculated in two shots rather than three.

The second vaccine is currently being tested in Kenya, where it is expected to produce similar results as Pfizer’s previous one: 50% effectiveness against malaria.

After all, we’re dealing with a living virus.

  • A virus is a living thing.
  • A virus is not a bacteria.
  • A virus is not a fungus.
  • A virus is not a parasite.
  • A virus is not a prion.

And it’s certainly not “virus.”

Conclusion

Some are understandably worried about the prospect of booster shots. In a world where we have more than enough vaccines, and the landfills of frozen vials, people may feel like there is no need for boosters. That’s understandable. But don’t forget that there are many people who are still vulnerable to this virus, and they need as much protection as possible. In fact, it’s not just about them–investing in your health can help everyone around you too!

Although the overall risks are low, if you are pregnant or were recently pregnant, you are more likely to get very sick from COVID-19 compared to people who are not pregnant. People who get very sick from COVID-19 may require hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), or use of a ventilator or special equipment to breathe. Severe COVID-19 illness can also lead to death. Additionally, if you have COVID-19 during pregnancy, you are at increased risk of complications that can affect your pregnancy and developing baby. For example, COVID-19 during pregnancy increases the risk of delivering a preterm or stillborn infant.

Safety and Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccination during Pregnancy

pregnant asian woman with bandaid on shoulder

Evidence continues to build showing that COVID-19 vaccination before and during pregnancy is safe and effective. It suggests that the benefits of receiving a COVID-19 vaccine outweigh any known or potential risks of vaccination during pregnancy. Below is a brief summary of the growing evidence:

  • COVID-19 vaccines do not cause COVID-19 infection, including in people who are pregnant or their babies. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain live virus. They cannot make anyone sick with COVID-19, including people who are pregnant or their babies.
  • Data on the safety of receiving an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty), during pregnancy are reassuring.
    • Early data from three safety monitoring systems did not find any safety concerns for people who received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine late in pregnancy or for their babies.1
    • Scientists have not found an increased risk for miscarriage among people who received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine just before and during early pregnancy (before 20 weeks of pregnancy).2-4
    • In a study of more than 40,000 pregnant women, COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy was not associated with preterm birth or delivering an infant small for their gestational age.5
    • The monitoring of COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy is ongoing. CDC will continue to follow people vaccinated during all trimesters of pregnancy to better understand effects on pregnancy and babies.
  • Data show that receiving an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy reduces the risk for infection and severe illness for people who are pregnant. Recent studies compared people who were pregnant and received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine with people who did not. Scientists found that COVID-19 vaccination lowered the risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19 and was even more effective at reducing the risk of getting very sick from COVID-19.6-10
  • Vaccination during pregnancy builds antibodies that might protect the baby. When people receive an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy, their bodies build antibodies against COVID-19, similar to people who are not pregnant. Antibodies made after a pregnant person received an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine have been found in umbilical cord blood. This means COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy might help protect babies against COVID-19. More data are needed to determine how these antibodies, similar to those produced with other vaccines, may provide protection to the baby.11-13
    • A recent small study found that at 6 months old, the majority (57%) of infants born to pregnant people who were vaccinated during pregnancy had detectable antibodies against COVID-19, compared to 8% of infants born to pregnant people who had COVID-19 during pregnancy.14
  • New data show that completing a two-dose primary mRNA COVID-19 vaccine series during pregnancy can help protect babies younger than 6 months old from hospitalization due to COVID-19. In this report, the majority (84%) of babies hospitalized with COVID-19 were born to pregnant people who were not vaccinated during pregnancy.15
  • No safety concerns were found in animal studies. Studies in animals receiving a ModernaPfizer-BioNTech, or Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 vaccine before or during pregnancy found no safety concerns in pregnant animals or their babies.
  • No adverse pregnancy-related outcomes occurred in previous clinical trials that used the same vaccine platform as the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccines that use the same viral vector as the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine have been given to people in all trimesters of pregnancy, including in a large-scale Ebola vaccination trial. No adverse pregnancy-related outcomes, including adverse outcomes affecting the baby, were associated with vaccination in these trials. Learn more about how viral vector vaccines work.

More clinical trials on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines and how well they work in people who are pregnant are underway or planned. Vaccine manufacturers are also collecting and reviewing data from people in the completed clinical trials who received a vaccine and became pregnant during the trial.

V-safe provides quick and confidential health check-ins via text messages and web surveys so you can quickly and easily share with CDC how you or your dependent feel after getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

People who are Pregnant

pregnant woman holding belly

CDC recommends that people who are pregnant get vaccinated and stay up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines, including getting a COVID-19 booster shot when it’s time to get one. CDC recommendations align with those from professional medical organizations serving people who are pregnant, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologistsexternal iconSociety for Maternal Fetal Medicineexternal icon, and the American Society for Reproductive Medicineexternal icon, along with many other professional medical organizations.

Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred over the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine for primary and booster vaccination, but the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations.

Getting a COVID-19 vaccine can protect you from getting very sick from COVID-19, and keeping you as healthy as possible during pregnancy is important for the health of your baby. If you are pregnant, consider having a conversation with your healthcare professional about COVID-19 vaccination. While such a conversation might be helpful, it is not required before vaccination. You can receive a COVID-19 vaccine, including a booster shot, without any additional documentation from your healthcare professional.

Common Questions about Vaccination during Pregnancy

What are the long-term effects on the baby when a person gets a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy?

Scientific studies to date have shown no safety concerns for babies born to people who were vaccinated against COVID-19 during pregnancy.1,5 Based on how these vaccines work in the body, experts believe they are unlikely to pose a risk for long-term health effects. CDC continues to monitor, analyze, and disseminate information from people vaccinated during all trimesters of pregnancy to better understand effects on pregnancy and babies.

When during pregnancy should a person get a COVID-19 vaccine?

CDC and professional medical organizations, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, recommend COVID-19 vaccination at any point in pregnancy, as well as booster doses for those eligible. COVID-19 vaccination can protect you from getting very sick from COVID-19, and keeping you as healthy as possible during pregnancy is important for the health of your baby.

Which COVID-19 vaccine should pregnant people receive?

In most situations, including for people who are pregnant and people who are breastfeeding, Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred over the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine for primary and booster vaccination due to the risk of serious adverse events. Thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) is a rare but serious adverse event that causes blood clots in large blood vessels and low platelets (blood cells that help form clots) and is associated with the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccine recipients must be informed of the risks and benefits of J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccination. The J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations, including for persons who

  • Had a severe reaction after an mRNA vaccine dose or who have a severe allergy to an ingredient of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines),
  • Would otherwise remain unvaccinated for COVID-19 due to limited access to Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines); or
  • Wants to get the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine despite the safety concerns.

Learn more about the considerations for J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

If you are pregnant and have questions about COVID-19 vaccine

If you would like to speak to someone about COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy, you can contact MotherToBaby whose experts are available to answer questions in English or Spanish by phone or chat. The free and confidential service is available Monday–Friday, 8am–5pm (local time). To reach MotherToBaby:

People who are Breastfeeding

CDC recommends that people who are breastfeeding get vaccinated and stay up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines, including getting a COVID-19 booster shot when it’s time to get one.  Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred over the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine for primary and booster vaccination, but the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations. Clinical trials for the COVID-19 vaccines currently used in the United States did not include people who were breastfeeding. Therefore, there are limited data available on the

  • Safety of COVID-19 vaccines in people who are breastfeeding
  • Effects of vaccination on the breastfed baby
  • Effects on milk production or excretion

COVID-19 vaccines cannot cause COVID-19 infection in anyone, including the mother or the baby. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain live virus. Vaccines are effective at preventing COVID-19 in people who are breastfeeding. Recent reports have shown that breastfeeding people who have received mRNA COVID-19 vaccines have antibodies in their breastmilk, which could help protect their babies. More data are needed to determine what level of protection these antibodies may provide to the baby.13, 16-20

Vaccine Side Effects

Side effects can occur after receiving any of the available COVID-19 vaccines, especially after the second dose for vaccines that require two doses or a booster. People who are pregnant have not reported different side effects from people who are not pregnant after vaccination with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines (Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines). 1 Fever, for any reason,  has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Fever in pregnancy may be treated with acetaminophen as needed, in moderation, and in consultation with a healthcare provider. Learn more at Possible Side Effects After Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine.

Although rare, some people have had severe allergic reactions after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk with your healthcare provider if you have a history of allergic reaction to any other vaccine or injectable therapy (intramuscular, intravenous, or subcutaneous).

Key considerations you can discuss with your healthcare provider include:

  • The benefits of vaccination
  • The unknown risks of developing a severe allergic reaction
  • If you have an allergic reaction after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy, you can receive treatment for it.

People Who Would Like to Have a Baby

CDC recommends that people who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners, get vaccinated and stay up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines, including getting a COVID-19 booster shot when it’s time to get one. Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna (mRNA COVID-19 vaccines) are preferred over the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine for primary and booster vaccination, but the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine may be considered in some situations. In addition, everyone who is trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future, should get a booster shot if eligible.

Pregnancy Booster Shot Covid

Immunisation against SARS-CoV-2 with mRNA vaccines remains the most effective way of preventing COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. Medium-term data show that the efficacy of mRNA vaccination (two doses) is robust for up to 5–6 months, as supported by immunogenicity studies.

1

 

2

 Thereafter, the effectiveness of mRNA vaccines diminishes, and booster doses have been recommended for various high-risk groups. In 2021, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended booster doses for pregnant and post-partum women on the basis of their increased risk of COVID-19-related complications.

3

 However, data on the durability of immune response in pregnant women are scarce.

Barda and colleagues reported the effectiveness of booster mRNA vaccines in a large population study from Israel.

4

 A booster dose administered at least 5 months after the second dose significantly reduced the rate of new COVID-19 infections, hospital admissions, and severe infections in a cohort of 1 158 269 individuals with a median follow-up time of 2 weeks. Based on these results, the number-needed-to-boost (NNB) to prevent one excess case of hospital admission was lower than the NNB to prevent severe COVID-19 (table). However, for each of these outcomes, NNBs were about 20 times higher in those younger than 40 years, and 10–25 times higher in those without comorbidities, reflecting much lower absolute complication rates. Although these NNB estimates to prevent severe COVID-19 might be an overestimate for pregnant women, who have a two to three times increased risk of severe COVID-19 (compared with other women of reproductive age), even halving these NNBs based on age would mean that more than 10 000 booster doses would be required to prevent one case of hospitalisation or severe COVID-19 in pregnancy when administered 5 months after the second dose. The actual NNB to prevent hospitalisation or severe COVID-19 will be lower in the long term as the study had a median follow-up time of only 2 weeks. However, only in the presence of comorbidity would the NNBs be comparable to those for initial vaccination in pregnancy.

5

TableRate of breakthrough cases without boosters and number-needed-to-boost to prevent one case, by age and comorbidity

4

Hospital admissionsSevere COVID-19
Excess cases without boosters (per 100 000)Number-needed-to-boost to prevent one caseExcess cases without boosters (per 100 000)Number-needed-to-boost to prevent one case
By age, years
16–394·920 4082·540 000
40–6996·7103454·41838
By comorbidity
Without existing comorbidities11·984033·132 258
One to two comorbidities101·998178·81269

Given the current low vaccination coverage among pregnant women, efforts have rightly focused on increasing vaccine uptake in unvaccin-ated individuals. It remains to be seen whether campaigns to address vaccine hesitancy among pregnant women, or ensuring equitable access to vaccination more generally, are more important than the allocation of resources to the administration of booster doses.

6

 Although any individual can decide to maximise their protection via booster doses, regardless of previous risk status, it is important to convey the magnitude of expected absolute effect for informed decision making (table). Algorithms assessing the risk of severe COVID-19 in pregnant women can be useful for triaging the need for boosters,

7

 and for considering women who might be at even higher risk of COVID-19, such as those who might not have developed an adequate immune response to vaccination (eg, organ transplant recipients and those with acquired immune deficiencies), those who might be at increased risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and other breakthrough infections (eg, health-care workers), or those who might be at high baseline risk for severe COVID-19 (eg, those with severe obesity or pregestational diabetes).

The global shortage of vaccines and unequal distribution of the available stock raises an important ethical dilemma for giving booster doses to any group. Unvaccinated pregnant women in low-income and middle-income countries are at much higher risk of dying from COVID-19 but are also less hesitant to receive vaccination.

8

 Furthermore, the absolute reduction in risk following a booster is likely to be small for most vaccinated pregnant women who do not have a comorbidity. Longitudinal profiling of immunogenicity induced by different types of vaccines in pregnant women is essential for informing booster timing. In the meantime, strategies for more equitable distribution of vaccines and reduction of vaccination hesitancy among the unvaccinated are likely to be more effective in reducing COVID-19 complications than offering boosters to all already-vaccinated pregnant women.

AK is a member of the COVAX working group and principal investigator of the PregCov trial and the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine trial. PH is the chief investigator of the PregCov trial. All authors are leading and collaborating on COVID-19 vaccine studies.

World Health Organization Covid Vaccine Pregnancy

Here is what you need to know.

Who should be vaccinated first?

As with all COVID-19 vaccines, health workers at high risk of exposure and older people should be prioritized for vaccination.

As more vaccine becomes available, additional priority groups should be vaccinated, with attention to people disproportionately affected by COVID-19 or who face health inequities.

Who else can take the vaccine?

The comorbidities studied in in the phase 3 clinical trial included chronic lung disease, significant cardiac disease, severe obesity, diabetes, liver disease and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Vaccination is recommended for persons with such comorbidities that have been identified as increasing the risk of severe COVID-19.

Immunocompromised persons are at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease, including persons living with HIV. As the immune response is reduced in such persons, an additional dose (third dose) is recommended as part of the primary vaccine series, 1-3 months after the second dose. Known HIV positive vaccine recipients should be provided with information and counselling.

Vaccination can be offered to people who have had COVID-19 in the past. But individuals may wish to defer their own COVID-19 vaccination for up to six months from the time of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Vaccine effectiveness is expected to be similar in breastfeeding women as in other adults. WHO recommends the use of the vaccine in breastfeeding women as in other adults. WHO does not recommend discontinuing breastfeeding because of vaccination.

Should pregnant women be vaccinated?

Given the adverse consequences of COVID-19 during pregnancy and the increasing data supporting a favorable safety profile of mRNA-1273 in pregnancy, WHO recommends the use of mRNA-1273 in pregnant individuals. WHO does not recommend pregnancy testing prior to vaccination. WHO does not recommend delaying pregnancy or terminating pregnancy because of vaccination.

Who should not take the vaccine?

Individuals with a history of severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine should not take this or any other mRNA vaccine.

Individuals who developed myocarditis or pericarditis following the first dose of mRNA-1273 vaccine should not receive additional doses of any COVID vaccine unless with the recommendation of their doctor or a healthcare professional. 

The vaccine should not be administered to persons younger than 12 years of age pending the results of further studies.

Can children and adolescents take the vaccine?

A phase 3 trial of the Moderna vaccine in adolescents aged 12–17 years showed that the vaccine was well tolerated, immunogenic, and efficacious.

WHO recommends the vaccine is taken in 2 doses (100 µg, 0.5 ml each) given intramuscularly, 8 weeks apart.

WHO recommends that countries should consider using the vaccine in children aged 12-17 only when high vaccine coverage with 2 doses has been achieved in the high priority groups as identified in the WHO Prioritization Roadmap. 

Children and adolescents aged 12-17 years of age with comorbidities that put them at significantly higher risk of serious COVID-19 disease, should be offered vaccination, alongside other high-risk groups.

Studies on the safety and efficacy of the vaccine in children aged below 12 are still ongoing.

What’s the recommended dosage?

SAGE recommends the use of the Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine at a schedule of two doses (100 µg, 0.5 ml each) 8 weeks apart. 

Compliance with the full schedule is recommended and the same product can be used for both doses.

SAGE recommends that severe and moderately immunocompromised persons should be offered an additional dose of vaccine. This is due to the fact that this group is less likely to respond adequately to vaccination following a standard primary vaccination series and are at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease. 

Is a booster dose recommended for this vaccine?

A booster dose may be considered 4 – 6 months after completion of the primary vaccination series, though this is mainly recommended for the higher priority-use groups, in accordance with the WHO Prioritization Roadmap.

WHO recommends the dosage of the booster dose is half the dose used in the primary vaccination series (50 µg at 0.25 ml).

The benefits of booster vaccination are recognized following increasing evidence of waning vaccine effectiveness against mild and asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection over time. 

Can this vaccine be ‘mixed and matched’ with other vaccines?

SAGE accepts two heterologous doses of WHO EUL COVID-19 vaccines as a complete primary series.

For countries considering heterologous schedules, WHO has made recommendations to ensure equivalent or favourable immunogenicity or vaccine effectiveness for heterologous versus homologous schedules:

  • Either of the WHO EUL COVID-19 vectored vaccine (Janssen or AstraZeneca Vaxzervia/COVISHIELD) can be used as a second dose following a first dose of the Moderna vaccine, dependant on product availability.
  • The Moderna vaccine can also be used as a second dose following any of the WHO EUL COVID-19 inactivated vaccines (Sinopharm, Sinovac or Bharat) or any of the vectored vaccines (Janssen or AstraZeneca Vaxzervia/COVISHIELD) 

Is it safe?

On 30 April, WHO listed the Moderna vaccine for emergency use. WHO’s Emergency Use Listing (EUL) assesses the quality, safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines and is a prerequisite for COVAX Facility vaccine supply.

The EMA has thoroughly assessed the data on the quality, safety and efficacy of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and authorized its use across the European Union.

SAGE recommends that all vaccinees be observed for at least 15 minutes after vaccination. Those who experience an immediate severe allergic reaction to the first dose should not receive additional doses.

Longer-term safety assessment involves continued follow up of clinical trial participants, as well as specific studies and continued surveillance of secondary effects or adverse events of those being vaccinated in the roll out.

The Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, a group of experts that provides independent and authoritative guidance to the WHO on the topic of safe vaccine use, receives and assesses reports of suspected safety events of potentially international impact. In October 2021, the GACVS COVID-19 subcommittee concluded that the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines have clear benefits in all age groups in reducing hospitalizations and deaths due to COVID-19.

How does this vaccine compare to other COVID-19 vaccines already in use?

It is impossible to compare vaccines head-to-head due to the different approaches taken in designing the respective studies, but overall, all of the vaccines that have achieved WHO Emergency Use Listing are highly effective in preventing severe disease and hospitalization due to COVID-19.

How efficacious is the vaccine?

The Moderna vaccine has been shown to have an efficacy of approximately 94.1 per cent in protecting against COVID-19, starting 14 days after the first dose, in the context of the ancestral strain.

Does it work against new variants?

Vaccine effectiveness against new variants of concern such as Delta and Omicron is relatively well maintained against severe disease, but lower against breakthrough infections. 

Does it prevent infection and transmission?

There is only modest impact on preventing mild infections and transmission, particularly in the context of Omicron. Immunity persists for several months, but the full duration is not yet known. A booster dose restores vaccine effectiveness against Omicron, in particular against severe disease.

In the meantime, we must maintain public health measures that work: masking, physical distancing, handwashing, respiratory and cough hygiene, avoiding crowds, and ensuring good ventilation.

Covid Vaccine and Trying to Conceive

  • COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for people who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future, as well as their partners.
  • People who are trying to get pregnant now or might become pregnant in the future should stay up to date with their COVID-19 vaccines, including getting a COVID-19 booster shot when it’s time to get one.
  • There is currently no evidence that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause fertility problems (problems trying to get pregnant) in women or men.
  • COVID-19 can make you very sick during pregnancy. Additionally, if you have COVID-19 during pregnancy, you are at increased risk of complications that can affect your pregnancy and developing baby.

Is Pfizer Covid Vaccine Safe For Pregnancy

It’s strongly recommended that you get vaccinated against coronavirus (COVID-19) if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding.

If you’re pregnant

If you’re pregnant, it’s important to get vaccinated to protect you and your baby.

You’re at higher risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19 if you’re pregnant. If you get COVID-19 late in your pregnancy, your baby could also be at risk.

If you have not had a COVID-19 vaccine yet, it’s recommended to get your first 2 doses as soon as possible. You do not need to delay vaccination until after you have given birth.

It’s preferable for you to have the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccine. This is because these vaccines have been more widely used during pregnancy in other countries and no safety concerns have been identified.

If you’ve already had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine for your 1st dose and did not have any serious side effects, you should have it again for your 2nd dose.

If you had a 2nd dose of a COVID-19 vaccine at least 3 months ago, you can get a booster dose.

The vaccines cannot give you or your baby COVID-19.

Booking your vaccination appointments

You can book your COVID-19 vaccination appointments online.

If you’re under 40, you’ll only be shown appointments for the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines.

If you’re 40 or over, you’ll be asked if you’re pregnant to make sure you’re only shown appointments for these vaccines.

Book your COVID-19 vaccination appointments

Information:

You’ll be able to discuss having a COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy at your vaccination appointment.

You can also speak to a GP or your maternity team for advice.

You may find the COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy decision aid from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (PDF, 616KB) helpful.

If you’re breastfeeding

You cannot catch COVID-19 from the vaccines and cannot pass it to your baby through your breast milk.

If you’re breastfeeding, the vaccines you can have depends on your age:

  • if you’re 40 or over, you can have any of the COVID-19 vaccines
  • if you’re under 40 and do not have a health condition that increases your risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19, it’s preferable for you to have the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccine

The Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines are preferable in people under 40 because of an extremely rare blood clotting problem linked to the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccine side effects

Fertility and COVID-19 vaccination

There’s no evidence the COVID-19 vaccines have any effect on your chances of becoming pregnant.

There’s no need to avoid getting pregnant after being vaccinated.

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