Supplements To Boost Energy During Pregnancy

The good news is that there are still simple methods to catch a boost even if you can’t order the Trenta coffee while you’re expecting.

Nothing exhausts you as much as a healthy pregnancy. Being pregnant is a demanding task! Actually, feeling exhausted is frequently one of the initial indications of pregnancy, and this weariness may last as your pregnancy develops.

According to Temeka Zore, MD, an ob-gyn and reproductive endocrinologist with Spring Fertility in California, one of the reasons you feel so exhausted is the surge in the hormone progesterone, which is necessary to maintain early pregnancy but can also have a sedative effect on women. She continues, “Growing another human is also just physically hard, so it’s crucial to fuel your body with the correct food and enough of rest.”

Another underlying cause for why pregnant women experience fatigue? changes in blood pressure, blood sugar, and blood volume.

1. Water

Okay, this one isn’t a food, but if you’re wondering how to get energy while pregnant, making sure to hydrate is one of the best ways. Water is the main component of blood and helps carry key nutrients to your cells, and fatigue is one of the first signs your body is low on fluids. Very few women actually drink six to eight glasses of water per day, and when you’re pregnant you’re supposed to have even more, since your body is busy making baby’s amniotic fluid. (The water you drink helps constantly replenish the fluid supply.) Dehydration can also up your risk of urinary tract infections and preterm labor.

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Sick of plain water? Frances Largeman-Roth, a registered dietician and author of Feed the Belly: The Pregnant Mom’s Healthy Eating Guide, suggests drinking coconut water, or adding mint, lemon, lime or cucumber slices to your H2O for a subtle kick of flavor. However you like your water, the key is carrying an 8-ounce bottle with you all day and sipping from it often.

2. Nuts

Snacking throughout the day can help keep your energy up—and nuts are a convenient (and healthy) option to carry with you. They offer protein and fiber to keep you fuller longer, plus healthy fats (including brain-boosting omega-3s) and magnesium (which you should be getting 350 milligrams of a day). Trying not to go too crazy with calories? Shell-on pistachios take longer to eat, giving your body more time to register that it’s full.

3. Oatmeal

Yet another reason not to skip breakfast! Oats are loaded with iron and zinc, two elements known for kicking fatigue to the curb. Plus, “oatmeal is rich in B vitamins, which are great for energy,” says llyse Schapiro, MS, RD, CDN, a certified dietician based in Greenwich, Connecticut. Not only do B vitamins support healthy cell function and help metabolize macronutrients such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, but they can also be great for people with anemia, as they help with blood regeneration. Oatmeal is also rich in soluble fiber—a slow-burning carbohydrate that’s great for sustained energy—and beta-glucan, a type of fiber that may help improve insulin sensitivity and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, Largeman-Roth explains.

4. Mangoes

Most pregnant women are mildly anemic, especially during the final stages of pregnancy when the body is prepping for birth and producing a ton of extra blood. And—you guessed it—anemia makes you tired. Your lifesaver? Mangoes. “The natural fruit sugars in mangoes lift energy levels,” Largeman-Roth says. “Plus, fresh mango is an excellent source of folate, which can help prevent birth defects.” Mango also has vitamin C, which helps your body absorb the energy-boosting effects of iron-rich foods, like lean red meat and beans.

5. Spinach

Spinach is an excellent example of an iron-rich food. Iron helps transport oxygen throughout your body, and a lack of iron can leave you feeling exhausted. One cup of boiled spinach offers 6.4 milligrams of iron. Keep a bag of it on hand for salads and sautés, and even sneak it into your Sunday lasagna. Note that while spinach is high in iron for a veggie, you need a whopping total of 27 milligrams of iron each day during pregnancy—so keep taking your prenatal vitamin too.

6. Sweet Potatoes

Here’s another food to help you reach your iron quota—one medium sweet potato offers 0.8 milligrams. Plus, the vitamin C and copper help your body absorb the iron. Bonus: Your body uses a sweet potato’s beta-carotene to make vitamin A, which helps baby’s eye, bone and skin development.

7. Apples

The phrase “an apple a day” was invented for a reason. Apples contain plenty of boron, another mineral that can help naturally boost energy, Schapiro says. Plus, they boast natural sugars like glucose and fructose, both simple carbs that can help offer a quick energy boost without blood sugar spikes. They’re also full of fiber (a little over 4 grams!), which can be effective when trying to regulate and control blood sugar. Yet another benefit to eating apples during pregnancy? According to a study that analyzed data from more than 1,200 pregnant women and their children after birth, apples may also be protective against the development of childhood asthma and allergies. Largeman-Roth recommends pairing an apple with two tablespoons of peanut or almond butter for a filling snack that has a balance of carbs, protein and healthy fat.

On the whole, foods rich in iron, protein and fiber are great ways to fuel the body and boost energy while pregnant. Along with the foods mentioned above, Zore suggests sneaking in eggs, salmon, beans, lentils, fresh fruits, vegetables, lean poultry, milk and cheese to help maintain your energy during pregnancy

What can you take for energy when pregnant?

Foods that contain a lot of Vitamin B6, like bananas and chicken, are especially good for boosting your energy level, as B6 helps your body recharge, and boost its serotonin levels, which will get you feeling better and more energized overall.

How can I boost my energy while pregnant?

Keys to fighting fatigue during pregnancy

  1. Choose nutrient- and protein-rich foods, such as low-fat milk, yogurt, beans, chicken breast, or peanut butter.
  2. Avoid turning to sugary foods or energy drinks for a quick fix. …
  3. Eat every four hours , beginning with a balanced breakfast. …
  4. Limit caffeine.

What week is most tired during pregnancy?

Fatigue can begin in the very first weeks of pregnancy. Some women notice pregnancy exhaustion as early as one week after conception. While fatigue typically gets better around the start of the second trimester, it often returns in the third trimester, though like every symptom it varies from pregnancy to pregnancy

Drinks to boost energy while pregnant

Frances Largeman-Roth, a registered dietician and author of Feed the Belly: The Pregnant Mom’s Healthy Eating Guide, suggests drinking coconut water, or adding mint, lemon, lime or cucumber slices to your H2O for a subtle kick of flavor

But remember, along with the types of food you’re eating, it’s also important for pregnant women to pay attention to how often they’re eating. Eating smaller meals more frequently to maintain a healthy diet in pregnancy is beneficial for a couple reasons, Zore explains. First, nausea and vomiting may prevent some women from eating larger meals. Second, in the third trimester, your expanding uterus will compress your stomach and digestive system, including your bowels, making it harder to consume larger meals, she says. Smaller, frequent meals are not only easier on your stomach, but they can also help reduce heartburn, nausea and other digestive issues while still maintaining your energy and blood sugar levels.

If you’re eating well and still feel super-sluggish, it could be due to an underlying problem. Take to your OB, who may want to test for anemia or check your thyroid.

Expert bios:

Temeka Zore, MD, is an ob-gyn and reproductive endocrinologist practicing at Spring Fertility in San Francisco. She received her medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine.

Frances Largeman-Roth, RDN, is a nutrition expert and New York Times bestselling author of books Feed the Belly: The Pregnant Mom’s Healthy Eating Guide and Eating In Color: Delicious, Healthy Recipes for You and Your Family. She earned her undergraduate degree from Cornell University and went on to complete her dietetic internship at Columbia University.

Ilyse Schapiro, MS, RD, CDN, is a certified nutritionist who runs a private practice in Greenwich, Connecticut. She is a graduate of New York University’s Nutrition and Dietetics Master’s program.

Please note: The Bump and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such. You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.

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