Vitamins Required For Early Pregnancy

Vitamins are essential for women with pregnancy-related health concerns, like fertility and prenatal and postnatal care. Vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 support your baby’s growth, but they are particularly important in the first trimester and when you’re trying to get pregnant. These vitamins are also essential for blood clotting and enzyme reactions. Our prenatal multivitamin with antioxidants is formulated to help you get all the nutrients your baby needs, including folic acid to help prevent birth defects. The following vitamins are required for early pregnancy: 1. Vitamin C 2. Omega-3 fatty acids 3. Biotin 4. Zinc 5. Folic acid 6. Iron 7. Vitamin B12

During the first weeks of pregnancy, multivitamins containing folate (also called folic acid) and iron help support the baby’s growth. Pregnancy is a time when you need to pay special attention to your health. One of the best ways to stay healthy is to eat well and take prenatal vitamins. These vitamins are specially formulated to provide your body with the nutrients it needs during pregnancy. Prenatal vitamins contain enough iron, folic acid and other important nutrients that you may be missing in your diet.

For pregnancy, you should aim to get a minimum of 400 micrograms of folic acid (or folate) a day. Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, the vitamin found in leafy green vegetables, citrus fruits, and legumes. Taking this supplement doesn’t replace your need for these foods, but it can help fill any gaps in your diet.

What Vitamins Are Best For Early Pregnancy

What Vitamins Are Best For Early Pregnancy? Keeping your baby healthy starts at conception. It is a crucial step in choosing the right vitamins for early pregnancy – one that many women tend to overlook. Vitamins are essential elements. they help your body avoid stress, and are essential to a healthy pregnancy. They can also be beneficial if you’re trying to conceive

Your body is working overtime to grow a little baby in there, and what you eat can have a big impact on your health and the health of your baby. Eat well and have fun with these delicious recipes for early pregnancy! Prenatal vitamins can help you with all the extra demands of pregnancy. This product contains the most important nutrients for supporting your baby’s healthy development in the first three months of pregnancy, as well as folate for preventing birth defects.

You’re pregnant! Congratulations are in order, but if you want to make your pregnancy as healthy as possible it is important to take vitamins. Most of our nutrition comes from what we eat, however the body does need some extra help during pregnancy. Prenatal vitamins target your specific stage of pregnancy and can give you the boost of vitamins and minerals that you need. Vitamin D is extremely important for pregnancy, as it helps with calcium absorption, which is critical for the development of the fetus’s bones and teeth. In addition, Vitamin D improves blood sugar levels for both mother and baby. Vitamin B12 assists in DNA formation and can help reduce stress by aiding in sleep.

What Vitamins Need For Pregnancy

When you’re pregnant, it’s important to get the right amount of vitamins every day. While vitamins are not a substitute for healthy eating habits, they can help fill in any gaps your diet might have and make sure that your baby gets everything she needs from you. Pregnancy is a special time in a woman’s life, and it requires close attention to nutrition and health. Here you’ll find everything you need to know about the vitamins you need for pregnancy, including which ones are safe to take during pregnancy.

While you are pregnant, your body needs vitamins more than ever to support yourself and your growing baby. Some of the most important nutrients for a healthy pregnancy include vitamin D, calcium, iron and folic acid. Make sure you are taking prenatal vitamins with all of these vital nutrients every day—your health and the health of your baby depend on it! Vitamin B6 is one of the most important supplements you can take during pregnancy. It’s involved in regulating mood and promotes healthy skin, hair and nails. For an added boost, add red peppers and sweet potatoes to your diet

The following vitamins in prenatal vitamins are absorbable by your body to provide your baby’s brain, eyes, and nervous system with the building blocks they need: C, D, and folic acid are especially important during pregnancy. In fact, be sure to get 400 mcg of folic acid every day for the first month of your pregnancy. It may help prevent birth defects like spina bifida.

What Supplements Should I Take During Early Pregnancy

Looking for a few supplements to aid in your pregnancy? the best time to start taking vitamins and supplements is before you get pregnant, but you can also start during early pregnancy. vitamin D, folic acid, prenatal vitamins and probiotics have all been shown to help with everything from getting pregnant to supporting the health of your baby.

According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), a woman’s intake of nutrients and vitamins during pregnancy should come from a variety of foods, including:

  • Proteins
  • Carbohydrates
  • Vitamins
  • Minerals
  • Fats

It is important to remember that with a healthy diet, you should be able to get the full amount of these vitamins and minerals. Talk with your healthcare provider about additional supplements to ensure that (1) you are getting enough of each vitamin/mineral, and (2) you are not exceeding the daily maximum for each vitamin/mineral, to avoid overdose/toxicity.
Since a healthy diet should provide most if not all of these vitamins and minerals, you likely will not need to take a prenatal supplement that contains 100% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) listed below in the table.

Essential Vitamin/Mineral:Why You Need It:Where You Find It:
Vitamin A & Beta Carotene
(770 mcg, daily max = 1000 mcg)
Helps bones and teeth growLiver, milk, eggs, carrots, spinach, green and yellow
vegetables, broccoli, potatoes, pumpkin, yellow fruits, cantaloupe
Vitamin D (5 mcg/600 IU, daily max = 4000 IU)Helps body use calcium and phosphorus; promotes strong
teeth and bones
Milk, fatty fish, sunshine
Vitamin E (15 mg, daily max = 1000 mg)Helps body form and use red blood cells and musclesVegetable oil, wheat germ, nuts, spinach, fortified cereals
Vitamin C (80 – 85 mg*, daily max = 2000 mg)An antioxidant that protects tissues from damage and helps
body absorb iron; builds a healthy immune system
Citrus fruits, bell peppers, green beans, strawberries,
papaya, potatoes, broccoli, tomatoes
Thiamin/B1 (1.4 mg)Raises energy level and regulates the nervous systemWhole grain, fortified cereals, wheat germ, organ meats,
eggs, rice, pasta, berries, nuts, legumes, pork
Riboflavin/B2 (1.4 mg)Maintains energy, good eyesight, healthy skinMeats, poultry, fish, dairy products, fortified cereals,
eggs
Niacin/B3 (18 mg, daily max = 35 mg)Promotes healthy skin, nerves, and digestionHigh-protein foods, fortified cereals, and bread, meats,
fish, milk, eggs, peanuts
Pyridoxine/B6 (1.9 mg, daily max = 100 mg)Helps form red blood cells; helps to reduce morning sicknessChicken, fish, liver, pork, eggs, soybeans, carrots, cabbage,
cantaloupe, peas, spinach, wheat germ, sunflower seeds, bananas,
beans, broccoli, brown rice, oats, bran, peanuts, walnuts
Vitamin B12 (2.6 mcg)An important factor in DNA synthesis, and may help prevent neural tube defects (NTDs)Shellfish, fish, beef, liver, pork, eggs, dairy, poultry
Folic Acid/Folate (400 – 800 mcg†, daily max = 1000 mcg)Helps support the placenta and prevents spina bifida and other NTDsOranges, orange juice, strawberries, green leafy vegetables,
spinach, beets, broccoli, cauliflower, fortified cereals,
peas, pasta, beans, nuts
Calcium (1,000 – 1,300 mg‡)Creates healthy bones and teeth, helps prevent blood clots, helps muscles and nerves functionYogurt, milk, cheddar cheese, calcium-fortified foods
like soy milk, juices, bread, cereals, dark green leafy vegetables,
canned fish with bones
Iron (27 mg)Helps in the production of hemoglobin; prevents anemia, low birth weight, and premature deliveryBeef, pork, dried beans, spinach, dried fruits, wheat
germ, oatmeal or grains fortified with iron
Protein (71 g)Helps in the production of amino acids; repairs cellsMost animal foods, meat, poultry, eggs, dairy products,
veggie burgers, beans, legumes, nuts
Zinc (11 – 13 mg**)Helps produce insulin and enzymesRed meats, poultry, beans, nuts, whole grains, fortified
cereals, oysters, dairy products

* Vitamin C:  for pregnant women under 18 years of age, 80 mg is suggested; for those above 18 years, 85 mg is recommended.
† Folic Acid/Folate:  any level between 400 and 800 micrograms/mcg (or 0.4 and 0.8 milligrams/mg) is typically safe for pregnancy; check with your healthcare provider to find what level is right for you.
‡ Calcium:  for pregnant women in their teen years, 1300 mg is suggested; for those age 20 and above, 1000 mg is suggested.
** Zinc:  for pregnant women under 18 years of age, 13 mg is suggested; for those above 18 years, 11 mg is suggested.
If you have any dietary restrictions or concerns that you may not be getting enough of certain vitamins or minerals, talk to your healthcare provider and/or nutritionist about supplementation options or dietary recommendations.

If you are on a budget, use these tips to save money on your pregnancy supplements. Having a healthy and balanced diet is a crucial part in every women’s life. But during pregnancy there are some additional supplements that should be taken to ensure the health of you and your baby. To learn more go through our article on prenatal vitamins.

At this stage of pregnancy, you and your baby are very vulnerable. Therefore, it’s important to make sure you’re getting the right nutrition and vitamins. In early pregnancy, it’s important to take a daily multivitamin with folic acid. It’s also a good idea to make sure you are getting enough iron and calcium in your diet. Chances are, you’re eating an extra 300 calories per day — so don’t let yourself fall short on nutrition now that the baby is growing!

What Vitamins Do You Need When You’re Pregnant

In the past, you might have heard that you need an increased amount of some vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. You may have even been given specific recommendations such as increasing your folic acid intake or adding iron to your diet. But, thanks to recent research studies, we now know that most women don’t need any extra vitamins when they are pregnant. The vitamins you need are very different during pregnancy and the months following childbirth. Some vitamins, like folic acid, are essential for both mother and baby, so it’s important to take them before getting pregnant as well. The vitamins you need are very different during pregnancy and the months following childbirth. Some vitamins, like folic acid, are essential for both mother and baby, so it’s important to take them before getting pregnant as well.

Our list of pregnancy nutrients below gives information on how much of each nutrient you need each day, whether you’re likely to need a supplement, and the benefits for your baby. We also list some of the best foods that include these nutrients. To learn more, and get more ideas for including these nutrients in your pregnancy diet, follow the links to our more in-depth articles.

Most important nutrients during pregnancy

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the following vitamins and minerals are key during pregnancy. Additionally, research shows that omega-3 fatty acids are important for your baby’s brain and eye development.

Calcium

Daily amount during pregnancy: 1,300 mg for women ages 18 and younger, and 1,000 mg for women ages 19 to 50.

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Do you need a calcium supplement? The best way to get enough calcium is through a well-balanced diet and from your prenatal vitamin. If you think you aren’t getting the recommended daily amount, talk to your healthcare provider about possibly adding a separate calcium supplement.

Benefits to your baby: Calcium helps to grow strong bones and teeth, a healthy heart, nerves, and muscles. Also, it contributes to the development of normal heart rhythm and blood clotting.

Some food sources of calcium:

  • 8 ounces calcium-fortified orange juice: 349 mg
  • 8 ounces plain, low-fat yogurt: 415 mg
  • 8 ounces nonfat milk: 299 mg
  • 8 ounces calcium-fortified soy milk: 299 mg

Learn more about calcium in your pregnancy diet.

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Iron

Daily amount during pregnancy: 27 mg

Do you need an iron supplement? You may need an iron supplement – your provider will recommend one if so. You need a lot more iron during pregnancy, and it can be difficult to meet this goal through your diet and prenatal vitamin alone.

Note: There are two forms of iron: heme and non-heme. Heme iron is found only in animal sources and is easier for your body to absorb. Non-heme iron is found in plants, iron-fortified foods, and supplements.

Benefits to your baby: Iron is essential for making hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to other cells. It also builds cartilage and other connective tissue.

Some food sources of iron:

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  • 8 ounces lentils, cooked: 6.6 mg non-heme iron
  • 8 ounces prune juice: 3.0 mg non-heme iron
  • 3 ounces lean beef, chuck: 2.2 mg heme iron
  • 3 ounces canned light tuna: 1.3 mg heme iron

Learn more about iron in your pregnancy diet.

Iodine

Daily amount during pregnancy: 220 mcg

Do you need an iodine supplement? Iodine is found in many foods and prenatal vitamins (as well as iodized table salt), so you probably won’t need to take a supplement.

Benefits to your baby: Iodine regulates metabolism and helps the brain, skeleton, and nervous system develop properly.

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Some food sources of iodine:

  • 3 ounces cod, baked: 158 mcg
  • 8 ounces nonfat milk: 85 mcg
  • 1.5 grams iodized table salt: 76 mcg
  • one large egg, hard boiled: 26 mcg

Learn more about iodine in your pregnancy diet.

Choline

Daily amount during pregnancy: 450 mg

Do you need a choline supplement? You may be able to get enough choline by eating a varied diet, but many pregnant women don’t get enough from diet alone and may need a supplement. Ask your provider whether you need a prenatal vitamin with choline (most prenatal vitamins don’t include it) or a choline supplement to meet your daily requirement during pregnancy.

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Benefits to your baby: Choline supports healthy brain and spinal cord development, and some studies suggest it may help prevent neural tube defects.

Some food sources of choline:

  • one large egg, hard boiled: 147 mg
  • 3 ounces top round beef, braised: 117 mg
  • 3 ounces chicken breast, roasted: 72 mg
  • 4 ounces broccoli, cooked: 31 mg

Learn more about choline in your pregnancy diet.

Vitamin A

Daily amount during pregnancy: 750 mcg RAE (retinol activity equivalents) for women ages 18 and younger, 770 mcg RAE for women ages 19 and older

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Do you need a vitamin A supplement? Probably not. Most people get plenty from their diet, and prenatal vitamins usually contain vitamin A. Read the label on your prenatal vitamin to make sure you’re not getting more than the recommended amount. Too much preformed vitamin A can cause birth defects and liver toxicity.

Benefits to your baby: Vitamin A is important for the development of organs, bones, and eyes as well as the circulatory, respiratory, and central nervous systems.

Some food sources of vitamin A:

  • one sweet potato, baked in skin: 1,4031 mcg RAE
  • 4 ounces frozen spinach, boiled: 573 mcg RAE
  • 4 ounces carrots, raw: 459 mcg RAE
  • 8 ounces vanilla soft serve ice cream: 278 mcg RAE

Learn more about vitamin A in your pregnancy diet.

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Vitamin C

Daily amount during pregnancy: 80 mg for women ages 18 and younger, 85 mg for women ages 19 and older

Do you need a vitamin C supplement? No. Most people get plenty from their diet, and prenatal vitamins usually contain vitamin C.

Benefits to your baby: Vitamin C is essential for making collagen, a structural protein that’s a component of cartilage, tendons, bones, and skin. It also helps build healthy gums, teeth, and bones.

Some food sources of vitamin C:

  • 6 ounces orange juice: 93 mg
  • one medium kiwi: 64 mg
  • 4 ounces green bell pepper, raw: 60 mg
  • 4 ounces broccoli, cooked: 51 mg

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Learn more about vitamin C in your pregnancy diet.

Vitamin D

Daily amount during pregnancy: 600 IU (15 mcg) or more

Do you need a vitamin D supplement? Maybe. The amount required during pregnancy is a topic of debate, so you may want to ask your provider whether they think your prenatal vitamin and diet provide enough vitamin D.

Benefits to your baby: Vitamin D helps build your baby’s bones and teeth.

Some food sources of vitamin D:

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  • 3 ounces farmed rainbow trout, cooked: 654 IU (16.2 mcg)
  • 3 ounces cooked salmon (sockeye): 570 IU (14.2 mcg)
  • 8 ounces two-percent milk, fortified with vitamin D: 120 IU (2.9 mcg)
  • one large scrambled egg: 44 IU (1.1 mcg)

Learn more about vitamin D in your pregnancy diet.

Vitamin B6

Daily amount during pregnancy: 1.9 mg

Do you need a vitamin B6 supplement? No. Most people get plenty from their diet, and prenatal vitamins usually contain at least 100 percent of the recommended amount of vitamin B6.

Benefits to your baby: Vitamin B6 helps your baby metabolize protein and carbohydrates and is vital for your baby’s developing brain and nervous system.

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Some food sources of vitamin B6:

  • 8 ounces chickpeas, canned: 1.1 mg
  • 3 ounces fresh yellowfin tuna, cooked: 0.9 mg
  • 3 ounces chicken breast, roasted: 0.5 mg
  • one medium banana: 0.4 mg

Learn more about vitamin B6 in your pregnancy diet.

Vitamin B12

Daily amount during pregnancy: 2.6 mcg

Do you need a vitamin B12 supplement? You may if you’re a vegan or vegetarian during pregnancy, you don’t eat B12-fortified plant foods daily, and your prenatal vitamin doesn’t include vitamin B12.

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Benefits to your baby: Vitamin B12 is important for your baby’s developing spinal cord and brain. It also helps with formation of red blood cells and DNA.

Some food sources of vitamin B12:

  • 3 ounces Atlantic salmon, cooked: 2.6 mcg
  • 3 ounces ground beef, 85-percent lean, pan browned: 2.4 mcg
  • 8 ounces 2-percent milk: 1.3 mcg
  • 1 serving breakfast cereal fortified with 25 percent of the daily value for vitamin B12: 0.6 mcg

Learn more about vitamin B12 in your pregnancy diet.

Folic acid

Daily amount during pregnancy: at least 600 mcg

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Do you need a folic acid supplement? You need a prenatal vitamin or folic acid supplement to meet your daily requirement during pregnancy because it can be hard to get all the folic acid you need from food alone.

Benefits to your baby: Folic acid helps prevent neural tube defects, may reduce the risk of other birth defects, and is critical for producing DNA (the building block of cells).

Some food sources of folic acid:

  • 4 ounces spinach, boiled: 131 mcg
  • 4 spears asparagus, boiled: 89 mcg
  • 1/2 cup avocado: 59 mcg
  • 4 ounces kidney beans, canned: 46 mcg

Learn more about folic acid in your pregnancy diet.

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DHA (docosahexaenoic acid – an omega-3 fatty acid)

Daily amount during pregnancy: At least 200 mg

Do you need a DHA supplement? If low-mercury fish isn’t a regular part of your diet or your prenatal vitamin doesn’t have at least 200 mg of DHA, you could take fish oil or another separate omega-3 supplement that includes the recommended amount of DHA.

Benefits to your baby: DHA is important for the development of your baby’s brain and eyes.

Some food sources of DHA:

  • 3 ounces farmed Atlantic salmon, cooked: 1,240 mg
  • 3 ounces wild rainbow trout, cooked: 440 mg
  • 3 ounces shrimp, cooked: 120 mg
  • 3 ounces tilapia, cooked: 110 mg

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Learn more about DHA in your pregnancy diet.

Other essential nutrients for pregnancy

Chromium

Daily amount during pregnancy: 29 mcg for women ages 18 and younger, 30 mcg for women ages 19 to 50

Do you need a chromium supplement? You don’t need to take chromium supplements because it’s found in many foods and in many prenatal vitamins. Talk to your provider if you’re concerned that you may have a chromium deficiency.

Benefits to your baby: Chromium promotes the building of protein in your baby’s growing tissues.

Some food sources of chromium:

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  • 8 ounces grape juice: 7.5 mcg
  • 3 ounces ham: 3.6 mcg
  • one whole wheat English muffin: 3.6 mcg
  • 1 cup orange juice: 2.2 mcg

Learn more about chromium in your pregnancy diet.

Copper

Daily amount during pregnancy: 1,000 mcg for women ages 18 and younger, 1,300 mcg for women ages 19 and older

Do you need a copper supplement? If you eat a healthy, varied diet, you’ll probably get enough copper and won’t need a supplement. A good prenatal vitamin also usually includes an adequate amount of copper. (Check product labels.)

Benefits to your baby: Copper helps to form the heart, blood vessels, and skeletal and nervous systems.

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Some food sources of copper:

  • 1 medium potato with skin, cooked: 675 mcg
  • 1 ounce cashew nuts, dry roasted: 629 mcg
  • 3 ounces Dungeness crab, cooked: 624 mcg
  • 1 ounce dark chocolate, 75 to 85 percent cacao solids: 501 mcg

Learn more about copper in your pregnancy diet.

Magnesium

Daily amount during pregnancy: 400 mg for women ages 18 and younger, 350 mg for women ages 19 to 30, 360 mg for women ages 31 to 50

Do you need a magnesium supplement? Probably not. You’re most likely getting enough if you eat a healthy, varied diet. If you’re worried you’re falling short, look for a prenatal vitamin with magnesium.

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Benefits to your baby: Magnesium helps build strong bones and teeth, and research suggests it may help prevent preterm labor and other pregnancy complications.

Some food sources of magnesium:

  • 1 ounce pumpkin seeds, roasted: 156 mg
  • 1 ounce chia seeds: 111 mg
  • 1 ounce almonds, dry roasted: 80 mg
  • 4 ounces spinach, boiled: 78 mg

Learn more about magnesium in your pregnancy diet.

Manganese

Daily amount during pregnancy: 2 mg

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Do you need a manganese supplement? Probably not. You’re most likely getting enough if you eat a healthy, varied diet. Most prenatal vitamins do not include manganese.

Benefits to your baby: Manganese helps form bones and cartilage, helps protect cells from damage, and activates enzymes that help metabolize carbohydrates, cholesterol, and amino acids.

Some food sources of manganese:

  • 1 ounce pecans, dry roasted: 1.1 mg
  • 4 ounces medium-grain brown rice, cooked: 1.1 mg
  • 4 ounces spinach, boiled: 0.8 mg
  • 1/2 cup oatmeal, cooked: 0.7 mg

Learn more about manganese in your pregnancy diet.

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Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5)

Daily amount during pregnancy: 6 mg

Do you need a pantothenic acid supplement? Probably not. You most likely get enough if you eat a healthy, varied diet. Plus, most prenatal vitamins include pantothenic acid.

Benefits to your baby: B5 is essential for the production of red blood cells and hormones, plus it helps synthesize cholesterol and metabolize carbohydrates and fats for energy.

Some food sources of pantothenic acid:

  • 3 ounces skinless chicken breast, roasted: 1.3 mg
  • 3 ounces fresh bluefin tuna, cooked: 1.2 mg
  • 1/2 avocado: 1 mg
  • 8 ounces two-percent milk: 0.9 mg

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Learn more about pantothenic acid in your pregnancy diet.

Phosphorus

Daily amount during pregnancy: 1,250 mg for women ages 18 and younger, 700 mg for women ages 19 and older

Do you need a phosphorus supplement? No. You’ll get plenty of phosphorus if you eat a healthy, varied diet. Most prenatal vitamins don’t contain phosphorus.

Benefits to your baby: Phosphorus helps build strong bones and develops blood clotting, kidney function, and normal heart rhythm.

Some food sources of phosphorus:

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  • 6 ounces plain low-fat yogurt: 245 mg
  • 8 ounces two-percent milk: 226 mg
  • 4 ounces lentils, boiled: 178 mg
  • 1 ounce cashew nuts, dry roasted: 139 mg

Learn more about phosphorus in your pregnancy diet.

Potassium

Daily amount during pregnancy: 2,600 mcg for women ages 18 and younger, 2,900 mcg for women ages 19 and older

Do you need a potassium supplement? No. You’ll probably get plenty of potassium if you eat a healthy, varied diet. Most prenatal vitamins don’t contain potassium.

Benefits to your baby: Potassium helps maintain the proper balance of fluids and electrolytes in the body and aids muscle contractions and nerve function.

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Some food sources of potassium:

  • 8 ounces cooked lentils: 731 mg
  • one medium baked potato without skin: 610 mg
  • 8 ounces orange juice: 496 mg
  • 1 medium banana: 422 mg

Learn more about potassium in your pregnancy diet.

Riboflavin (vitamin B2)

Daily amount during pregnancy: 1.4 mg

Do you need a riboflavin supplement? Probably not. A healthy, varied diet should provide all the riboflavin you need. If you’re worried about falling short, you can meet your daily requirement by taking a prenatal vitamin that contains riboflavin.

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Benefits to your baby: Riboflavin (vitamin B2) promotes growth, good vision, and healthy skin, and is essential for your baby’s bone, muscle, and nerve development. It may also help lower your risk of preeclampsia.

Some food sources of riboflavin

  • 8 ounces two-percent milk: 0.5 mg
  • 3 ounces beef tenderloin steak, boneless and grilled: 0.4 mg
  • 1 ounce almonds, dry roasted: 0.3 mg
  • 1 large egg, scrambled: 0.2 mg

Learn more about riboflavin in your pregnancy diet.

Thiamin

Daily amount during pregnancy: 1.4 mg

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Do you need a thiamin supplement? Probably not. A healthy, varied diet should provide all the thiamin you need. If you’re worried about falling short, you can meet your daily requirement by taking a prenatal vitamin that contains thiamin.

Benefits to your baby: Thiamin (vitamin B1) converts carbohydrates into energy and is essential for brain development. It also helps the heart, muscles, and nervous system function normally.

Some food sources of thiamin:

  • 1 serving fortified breakfast cereal: 1.2 mg
  • 3 ounces lean pork tenderloin: 0.8 mg
  • 1/2 cup black beans, cooked: 0.4 mg
  • one slice whole-wheat bread: 0.1 mg

Learn more about thiamin in your pregnancy diet.

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Zinc

Daily amount during pregnancy: 12 mg for women ages 18 and younger, 11 mg for women ages 19 and older

Do you need a zinc supplement? Maybe. If you’re not already getting enough in your diet, your prenatal vitamin will most likely provide all the zinc you need. But if you eat a mostly vegetarian diet, ask your provider if you also need a zinc supplement. It’s harder to absorb the mineral from plant foods.

Benefits to your baby: Zinc aids cell growth and is crucial for the production and functioning of DNA.

Some food sources of zinc:

  • 3 ounces beef chuck roast, cooked: 7.0 mg
  • 3 ounces pork loin, cooked: 2.9 mg
  • 3 ounces chicken (dark meat), cooked: 2.4 mg
  • 8 ounces low-fat yogurt with fruit: 1.7 mg
  • 1 ounce dry-roasted cashews: 1.6 mg

Pregnant women need to consume a wide variety of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients in order to ensure that their babies get the best start possible. Prenatal vitamins are designed to help fill in any gaps. Do you know whether your prenatal vitamin offers the full range of essentials? As your body changes, so do your nutritional needs. That’s why when you’re pregnant you need to increase your intake of vitamins and minerals.

It is crucial that pregnant women get enough nutrients each day. Vitamins help with weight gain and development, including brain-building. Vitamins are essential to support the baby’s development, ensure healthy growth and help protect a mother from potential infections during pregnancy.

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